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The Community for Data Integration (CDI) meetings are held the 2nd Wednesday of each month from 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Eastern Time.


Meeting Recording

Meeting recordings are available to CDI Members approximately 24 hours after the completion of the meeting. Please log in to view the recording. If you would like to become a member of CDI, email cdi@usgs.gov.

Agenda (in Eastern time)

11:00a Scientist's Challenge - Data Stories using Jupyter Notebooks to increase reusability of datasets - Richie Erickson, USGS  (Link to the challenge slides)

11:05a Welcome - Kevin Gallagher - Associate Director for Core Science Systems 190710-CDI-OpeningSlides.pdf

11:15a Working Group Announcements CDI-Announcements-190710.pdf

11:25a An Open Online Map of Landslide Occurrence across the U.S. Assembled from Incomplete and Disparate Spatial Data Sets - Ben Mirus, USGS

11:55a  U.S. Geological Survey National Digital Trails Network - Greg Matthews and Elizabeth McCartney, USGS

12:30p  Adjourn

Abstracts


Scientist's Challenge: Data Stories using Jupyter Notebooks to increase reusability of datasets - Richie Erickson

USGS scientists generate data and develop unique methods for analyzing it. Two problems emerging from this process include data reuse and sharing of methods. First, while large USGS datasets often get reused, many smaller datasets are not reused because people do not know how to work with them unless they are subject matter experts. Second, current USGS code releases often are static releases rather than interactive. Jupyter notebooks could help address these problem. Besides raising awareness of Jupyter Notebooks, I am looking to see who else is using Jupyter notebooks in USGS.

Richie Erickson is a Quantitative Research Ecologist at the Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center in La Crosse, Wi. His research currently focuses on controlling invasive species. 


An Open Online Map of Landslide Occurrence across the U.S. Assembled from Incomplete and Disparate Spatial Data Sets - Ben Mirus

Understanding spatial patterns is fundamental to Earth sciences and risk assessments, but spatial data are often collected at local scales, in disparate formats, and within specific jurisdictional boundaries. We encountered this issue when compiling a national-scale inventory of landslide occurrence across the U.S. into a searchable, web-based map for use by the public, researchers, and public officials. One critical challenge was determining which attribute fields were significant enough to be included at a national scale and also how to establish a fair and balanced schema for evaluating landslide confidence and inventory completeness across very different landslide inventories. Another challenge was determining a sustainable approach for ingesting data and maintaining the repository for long term access to current landslide occurrence information. In this presentation I will outline our process and present some of the successful solutions, as well as some of the more ad-hoc fixes.     

Ben Mirus started his USGS career in 2005 as an intern with the National Research Program in Menlo Park, CA, and he is now a research geologist with the Landslide Hazards Program in Golden, CO. Ben's research focuses primarily on hillslope hydrology and rainfall-triggered landslides using field monitoring and numerical modeling. 


U.S. Geological Survey National Digital Trails Network - Greg Matthews and Elizabeth McCartney

The purpose of the National Digital Trails Network (NDT) project is to support the Department of Interior priority to increase access and expand recreational opportunities on the Nation’s public lands by connecting trail systems. This project supports the Department of the Interior (DOI) priority to support conservation stewardship.

Currently the USGS aggregates trails and other recreational features from a variety of sources for publication on the US Topo map series and other products. The data is stored in a geospatial database that can be used for cartographic products and analysis. The USGS is using the data to perform geospatial analysis to identify and evaluate potential connections between trail systems.

The project goals over the next two years include:

  • Goal 1: Decision Support Tool. Provide a web-based interactive tool for DOI Regional Managers to conduct geospatial analysis to identify and prioritize candidate trails for extension of the existing trail network.  
  • Goal 2: Data Aggregation. Create a robust national trails GIS dataset that includes, at a minimum, trails from key Federal agencies including the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Bureau of Land Management;
  • Goal 3: Crowdsourcing. Create a mobile friendly application that will allow trail stewards, including employees of land management agencies as well as members of the public to maintain trails information.

Greg Matthews has been with the USGS since 2008 and currently works for The User Engagement Office of the National Geospatial Program as the Natural Resources Conservation Community of Use Coordinator.   

Elizabeth McCartney is a Cartographer in Applied Research  at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Geospatial Technical Operations Center.  Past roles include team leader for the USGS Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI) project known as The National Map Corps and regional POC for the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD).

Presentations


Presentation: Slides are available to CDI Members. Please log in to download the slides. If you would like to become a member of CDI, email cdi@usgs.gov.

Highlights

  1. CDI 2019 Workshop Slides, Recordings, and Take-aways (you need to log in as a CDI member, email cdi@usgs.gov to join)
  2. Richie Erickson is exploring the use of Jupyter Notebooks to increase reusability of datasets. In particular, smaller, project-level datasets that require explanation of disciplinary expertise and statistical analyses. If you are interested in learning more and possibly collaborating on a CDI Statement of Interest, get in contact with Richie Erickson at rerickson@usgs.govData Stories using Jupyter Notebooks to increase reusability of datasets
  3. Ask the CDI Sponsors. We had a number of questions collected at the CDI workshop that Kevin and Tim were not able to address at the time, and we’ll be working through those. Today’s question: “Tim & Kevin: Sounds like you envision USGS becoming a service agency like the National Weather Service, do you agree with that sentiment?” Answer: (paraphrasing) Kevin answered that we have a long history of supplying data to stakeholders, be it other Dept of Interior agencies or other partners. Some of our monitoring and near-real-time data in water, earthquakes, and volcanoes, fits the operational construct. However, the importance of basic research in order to interpret and gain actionable insights from the data is critical. An emphasis on service is important for maintaining relevance, but our research component is still very important.
  4. Ben Mirus’s presentation on the Open Online Map of Landslide Occurrence highlighted important considerations when integrating incomplete and disparate data. State boundaries often showed mismatches in data quantity or quality. Other topics of CDI interest included defining confidence metrics for the landslides, deciding on dataset update frequency, putting data releases through internal review, best practices for viewing heterogeneous data, identifying areas that need better data collection, and links from our science to governmental policy.
  5. Elizabeth McCartney and Greg Matthews’s presentation on the National Digital Trails Network showed a system that took existing trails and then uses an algorithm to identify and evaluate potential connections between trail systems using data like land type (owner), slope, and hydrography/river crossings. If you are interested in learning more you can contact the team at any of the following addresses: gdmatthews@usgs.gov, emccartney@usgs.gov, trails@usgs.gov.

Attendees


A Participant Report is available to CDI Members. Please log in to download the report. If you would like to become a member of CDI, email cdi@usgs.gov.