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Comment: Removed Jun 2019 open meeting reference

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Past Open Meeting

(next open meeting will be held June 26th, 2:30 PM ET; details TBD)

Presentation

(Presentations can be downloaded here)

Presenter


Call-in Information

Wednesday, March 27th

2:30 PM ET


Recent Detection and Spread of a new type of Trapa, an Invasive Aquatic Plant, in the Potomac River Watershed

A review of the information obtained from 2014 to 2018 on a new type of non-native water chestnut spreading in Virginia. How do we better reach out to stakeholders to inform them and encourage them to stop the spread of Trapa bispinosa? Are you aware of an existing federal or municipal program  or a case study of the use of EDRR for species  that threaten landscapes and aquatic areas?

Dr. Nancy Rybicki, USGS emeritus aquatic plant ecologist

In the past Dr. Rybicki conducted long term research projects on the increase of submersed aquatic vegetation abundance and diversity in the freshwater, tidal Potomac River during a time interval when water quality improved.  Her education was in Environmental Science and she is an affiliate professor at George Mason University.

This plant is a non-native floating aquatic plant that was discovered in 2014 in the Potomac River watershed and has been spreading rapidly since. Currently, it is reported and verified to occur in small colonies in about 30 water bodies, mostly ponds, in several northern Virginia counties (see the USGS NAS database for more information). Immediate action is needed to control this plant before it expands throughout the watershed and causes significant ecologicaleconomic and recreational impacts. 


Related publication:

Cryptic introduction of water chestnut (Trapa) in the northeastern United States

Chorak et al. 2019, Aquatic Botany 155:32-37

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aquabot.2019.02.006

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