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This page tracks the status and trends of wild populations.  The percentage of self-sustaing sustaining species (based on FAC's priority species) is the FAC Program's primary output measure, reported to the Department of Interior and to Congress.

NOTE:  In all status and trends designations below, the “Description” or “Evidence” field should provide a reference (from a report, journal article, etc.) or brief description of the information upon which the designated trend is based.   Be sure to include dates for supporting evidence.

7.3.1. What is "Assessment Status" and how do I determine the assessment status for the population?

The assessment status describes the quality or timeliness of assessment information relative to having the necessary data to adequately direct conservation actions to protect, conserve, and/or restore the population.

Current and Adequate: Includes assessments conducted in either the current fiscal year or following assessment  Includes assessments that are current, according to guidelines/schedules from approved plans .Current and Inadequate: Includes assessments conducted in either the current fiscal year or following assessment schedules from approved plans. While (e.g. for plans that call for annual assessments, a "current" assessment would be one conducted in the past year).  The assessment is "adequate" if it meets information needs or assessment guidelines from approved plans.

Current and Inadequate: While current, the assessment is inadequate in meeting information needs or assessment guidelines from approved plans.

Not Current, Historical Information Good: Includes assessments that are outdated,  but for which historical assessment information is sound and adequate. 

Not Current, Historical Information Poor: Includes assessments that are outdated and for which historic assessment data is limited or poor.

None: No population assessment information exists..

7.3.2. What is "Biological Status" and how do I determine the biological status of the population?

The biological status describes the population’s overall status and assists in determining the need for conservation actions to protect, conserve, and/or restore the population. Many factors are taken into account when assessing the biological status of a species: not simply the number of individuals remaining, but the overall increase or decrease in the population over time, breeding success rates, known threats, and so on, as well as new threats and/or recent catastrophic events (i.e., wildfire, drought, flooding, etc.). The status designation should be based on best professional judgment (and/or that of the relevant management entity, such as a Recovery Team).  

Depleted: A population whose abundance or distribution (or other appropriate measure) is below its management goals, or, in the absence of management goals, population abundance or distribution considered to be below historical levels.

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Unknown: Insufficient data available to determine status.

NOTE:  In all cases, the “Description” or “Evidence” field should provide a citation (from a report, journal article, etc.) or brief description of the information upon which the designated trend is based.   Be sure to include dates for supporting evidence.

7.3.3. What is "Population Trend" and how do I determine the trend of a population?

The population trend captures changes in population abundance and/or distribution ( as reflected in population age structure, genetic structure, etc.) over time.

Declining  – Based on current and adequate assessment information, or in the absence of current assessment information, based on historical or anecdotal information, the population assessment parameter is documented as decreasing, going from “better to worse,” becoming less or smaller—the opposite of increasing.

Stable - Based on current and adequate assessment information, or in the absence of current assessment information, based on historical or anecdotal information, the population is neither increasing or decreasing, based on historical or acceptable abundance and distribution (according to management plan)  Increasing nor decreasing.

Increasing - Based on current and adequate assessment information, or in the absence of current assessment information, based on historical information, the population is  documented to be increasing in abundance and/or distribution. .

Unknown - Indicates inadequate information exists upon which to determine the population trend.   NOTE:  In all cases, the “Evidence” field should provide a citation (from a report, journal article, etc.) or brief description of the information upon which the designated trend is based.   Be sure to include dates for supporting evidence. 

7.3.4.  What is the "Listing Status" field?

The listing status field provides a current list of all species (including DPS's / ESU's) that are listed by the FWS under the ESA from the Threatened and Endangered Species System (TESS) database.  Choose the ESA-listed species (or ESU or DPS) that is associated with your population (as relevant).

7.4. Location and Hydrologic Unit Code (HUC)

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