Confluence Retirement

Due to the feedback from stakeholders and our commitment to not adversely impact USGS science activities that Confluence supports, we are extending the migration deadline to January 2023.

In an effort to consolidate USGS hosted Wikis, myUSGS’ Confluence service is targeted for retirement. The official USGS Wiki and collaboration space is now SharePoint. Please migrate existing spaces and content to the SharePoint platform and remove it from Confluence at your earliest convenience. If you need any additional information or have any concerns about this change, please contact myusgs@usgs.gov. Thank you for your prompt attention to this matter.


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  • Study Reaches

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Key Points

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  • Site and Reach Name are required.
  • Delineation Date is highly recommended.
  • Reaches are project and station-specific
  • The full reach name is a combination of:
    • 1) SiteNumber
    • 2) ReachName, and
    • 3) Project
  • For example, '43185411440912–visitor center-SilverTNC' is a reach near NWIS station 43185411440912 used by the SilverTNC project that they called "visitor center"
  • The design of the BioData Study Reach incorporates Reaches incorporate ideas from NAWQA, NRSA, and other ecological studies. You may delineate a study reach
  • Study reaches may delineated in several ways, including:
  • Narrative descriptiondescriptions
  • In relation to a Reference Location
  • Upstream and downstream boundaries (Latitude/Longitude or Description)
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Conventions for recording reach boundaries

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If either boundary is upstream from the reference location, the curvilinear distance (along the thalweg) is negative; otherwise, the distance is positive.

'Curvilinear reach length' = 'Curvilinear distance to downstream boundary' MINUS 'Curvilinear distance to upstream boundary'

The stars (star) represent reference locations in the 3 examples: A, B, and C