Confluence Retirement

In an effort to consolidate USGS hosted Wikis, myUSGS’ Confluence service is scheduled for retirement on January 27th, 2023. The official USGS Wiki and collaboration space is now SharePoint. Please migrate existing spaces and content to the SharePoint platform and remove it from Confluence at your earliest convenience. If you need any additional information or have any concerns about this change, please contact myusgs@usgs.gov. Thank you for your prompt attention to this matter.

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Open Innovation Playbook for Risk Homepage

Climate Change Projects & Tools

  • Indigenous Observation Network (ION)

  • Local Environmental Observer Network (LEO)

  • iSeeChange

  • IceWatch USA

  • EyeOnWater

  • Globe Observer Land Cover

  • Climate Resilience Data Challenge


For the climate change case study, Indigenous Observation Network (ION) (Herman-Mercer et al. 2016, 2018, 2019; Toohey et al. 2016; Wilson et al. 2018), Local Environmental Observer Network (Brubaker et al. 2013, Mosites et al. 2018), ISeeChange (Drapkin et al. 2016, Drapkin 2018), IceWatch USA, EyeOnWater, Globe Observer Land Cover (Hayden et al. 2019, Janney 2019), and Climate Resilience Data Challenge projects will be surveyed to understand how community-based monitoring, engagement with indigenous communities, Traditional Ecological Knowledge, data collected online versus on-the-ground, and ground truthing remote sensing data can inform research on climate impacts. This case study will focus on the ION project by conducting online and in-person interviews at the Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center (AKCASC) and Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council (YRITWC) in Anchorage, AK. Participant observations will also be conducted by observing and video recording how USGS scientists engage with indigenous communities during their fieldwork in the summer. This study will also inform Watson’s proposed OI risk projects related to climate change with the Pacific Islands Climate Adaptation Science Center (PICASC) and Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK).

For floods, CrowdHydrology (Fienen and Lowry 2012, Lowry and Fienen 2013, Lowry et al. 2019), CrowdWater (Seibert et al. 2019, Strobl et al. 2019), What’s Your Water Level?, iFlood - Flood Reports, and Lowering the Cost of Continuous Streamflow Monitoring projects will be surveyed to understand how OI can be used to understand floods for hydrological risk reduction (Paul et al. 2018), measure water levels and high water marks, monitor hydrologic changes, detect flooding, improve flood and hydraulic models, as well as identify and deploy low-cost sensors. This case study will inform proposed OI risk projects like Ryberg’s “Historical Floods - Stakeholder Engagement and Data Acquisition” crowdsourcing project, which engages local communities to find and share old records with historic flood information to improve flood forecasting and increase public awareness of flood risk.

For wildfiresSmoke Sense...

Related Policies

Executive Order on Tackling the Climate Crisis at Home and Abroad


USGS Open Innovation Climate Change Projects



Indigenous Observation Network (ION)

  • Project Leads:
    • Ryan C Toohey (Alaska Climate Science Center)
    • Nicole M Herman-Mercer (USGS Branch of Regional Research, Central Region)
    • Paul F Schuster (USGS Branch of Regional Research, Central Region)
    • Edda Mutter (Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council)
  • Purpose:
  • Description:
    • The hydrology of the Yukon River Basin has changed over the last several decades as evidenced by a variety of discharge, gravimetric, and geochemical analyses.  The Indigenous Observation Network (ION), a community-based project, was initiated by the Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council and USGS.  Capitalizing on existing USGS monitoring and research infrastructure and supplementing USGS collected data, ION investigates changes in surface water geochemistry and active layer dynamics throughout the Yukon River Basin.  Over 1600 samples of surface water geochemistry (i.e., major ions, dissolved organic carbon, and 18O and 2H) have been collected at 35 sites throughout the Yukon River and its major tributaries over the past 15 years.  Active layer dynamics (maximum thaw depth, soil temperature and moisture) have been collected at 20 sites throughout the Yukon River Basin for the past eight years.  Important regional differences in geochemistry and active layer parameters linked to permafrost continuity and tributaries will be highlighted.  Additionally, annual trends and seasonal dynamics describing the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of the watershed will be presented in the context of observed hydrological changes.  These data assist the global effort to characterize arctic river fluxes and their relationship to the carbon cycle, weathering and permafrost degradation.    

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Local Environmental Observer Network (LEO)

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NASA GLOBE Observer Land Cover

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Climate Resilience Data Challenge

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Other Open Innovation Climate Change Projects



ISeeChange

Image result for iseechange

  • Purpose:
    • ISeeChange connects people to their changing environments to make solutions together. We crowdsource and analyze qualitative and quantitative data to inform public project planning, design, and emergency preparedness.
    • A virtual platform to help investigate how climate change affects your community. Pick an investigation that scientists, journalists, local cities, and community partners are actively researching and add sightings from your own backyard, neighborhood, or city. Each sighting will be paired with satellite, sensor, and weather data. This helps us identify local signs of change that correlate with bigger picture climate trends. ISeeChange empowers communities to observe how weather and climate affect their environment and daily life. Over time these micro-observations provide records that allow cities, engineers, scientists, and researchers to better model, respond to, and protect our communities as the climate continues to change.
  • Description:
    • Our climate is changing--and so are we. With ISeeChange, share your experiences and collect data to investigate our environment and help our communities through change. What you see change in your backyard, neighborhood, and city is important to our understanding of how climate change and weather affect our communities. Your observations and block-by-block insights can help cities, engineers and local organizations advocate for and create solutions to climate challenges. If you or your community has a question or hypothesis about how climate is changing your area, you can also use your ISeeChange account to collect data and answer those questions.

      • Create your account: Your account is a personal record of your sightings as well as a way to connect with your local community. Your location is generalized to protect your personal privacy.

      • Post a sighting: The best posts combine detailed stories and photos to show what you’re seeing in your environment and how it affects you. We then sync your stories to local weather data and trends.

      • Have conversations and connect: Comment on what others are seeing in your area and across the globe. Connect with community members on tips to manage the same climate challenges you are experiencing.

      • Help improve local knowledge and research: During weather events let us know what you’re seeing and check in on the feed to see what information your community is gathering. We may send push notifications and emails during local and regional weather events. When you respond to them, we do our best to share what you saw with people studying local weather trends.

      • Contribute to solutions: We share posts on social media, in newsletters and in reports to local partners that are working on solutions. Be sure to subscribe to our emails so you can be the first to know when we hear someone has used your post as data. This helps you and others track how your community is changing in response to climate change.



IceWatch USA

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EyeOnWater

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scistarter logo hi res - SciStarter Blog

SciStarter

  • Track Four Emerging Climate Hazards Near You Blog Post
    • GLOBE Observer Land Cover
      • Land cover — the material on earth’s surface, like grass or asphalt — is critical to many different processes on Earth and contributes to a community’s vulnerability to disasters like fire, floods or landslides. Join NASA GLOBE Observer to photograph the landscape, identify the kind of land cover you see and then match your observations to satellite data. Scientists will use your observations to improve global land cover maps.
    • CoCoRaHS

      • Just like the Postal Service, neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night prevents CoCoRaHS volunteers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds! In fact, that’s their favorite kind of weather. If this sounds like you, join the CoCoRaHS weather monitoring program. Use a rain gauge to collect data that are used by the National Weather Service, meteorologists, city utilities, teachers, students and many others to better understand both extreme precipitation and drought.

    • MyCoast

      • When stormy seas meet unyielding shore, the result is not always pretty. Use the MyCoast app to document tides, storm damage, beach cleanups, floods and more. Coastal decision makers, emergency managers and others use your reports to make decisions about resiliency plans.

    • ISeeChange

      • Become an environmental reporter with ISeeChange by documenting wildfires, floods, weather events and other phenomena. This groundbreaking project combines citizen science, citizen journalism, NASA satellite and weather data, sensors and community curiosity to monitor changing environmental conditions.