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FICMNEW continues to bridge the gap between federal agency invasive plant management and science activities and has been a driving force behind the national emphasis against the broader invasive species threat.

Past

Open Meeting

(next open meeting details TBDUSFS webinar)

Presentation

(Presentations can be downloaded here)

Presenter


Call-in Information

Wednesday

Thursday,

March 27th

July 18th

1:30 - 2:30 PM ET

Recent Detection and Spread of a new type of Trapa, an Invasive Aquatic Plant, in the Potomac River Watershed

A review of the information obtained from 2014 to 2018 on a new type of non-native water chestnut spreading in Virginia. How do we better reach out to stakeholders to inform them and encourage them to stop the spread of Trapa bispinosa? Are you aware of an existing federal or municipal program  or a case study of the use of EDRR for species  that threaten landscapes and aquatic areas?

Dr. Nancy Rybicki, USGS emeritus aquatic plant ecologist

In the past Dr. Rybicki conducted long term research projects on the increase of submersed aquatic vegetation abundance and diversity in the freshwater, tidal Potomac River during a time interval when water quality improved.  Her education was in Environmental Science and she is an affiliate professor at George Mason University.

This plant is a non-native floating aquatic plant that was discovered in 2014 in the Potomac River watershed and has been spreading rapidly since. Currently, it is reported and verified to occur in small colonies in about 30 water bodies, mostly ponds, in several northern Virginia counties (see the USGS NAS database for more information). Immediate action is needed to control this plant before it expands throughout the watershed and causes significant ecologicaleconomic and recreational impacts. 


Related publication:

Cryptic introduction of water chestnut (Trapa) in the northeastern United States

Chorak et al. 2019, Aquatic Botany 155:32-37

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aquabot.2019.02.006

Endogenous chemical isolates research and development for invasive species control and management

Endogenous biocides are a novel innovation in the treatment and management of non-native invasive plant species. This research between the Forest Service (Research & Development, Southern Research Station), Stephen F. Austin State University (Nacogdoches, TX), and Mississippi State University (Starkville, MS) seeks to utilize isolated chemicals produced and already present natively within the target plant species. When applied to infestations in specific concentrations or following chemical refining processes, these biocides can be auto-toxic and lethal to the undesirable species. This approach has already been demonstrated with local-scale, aquatic applications in Giant Salvinia (Salvinia molesta), with no non-target impacts observed. The collaborators on this research seek to identify and develop auto-toxic biocidal compounds for two highly invasive, non-native species in the southern United States: 1) Chinese tallow tree (Triadica sebifera) and 2) cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica & hybrids). Preliminary greenhouse trials of promising chemical isolates (endogenous biocides) applied to Chinese tallow tree seedlings have shown lethality within days. We seek to continue research and development of chemical compounds for the treatment of these and other highly invasive non-native species. We first plan to obtain and compare invasive and native lineages of both plant species in terms of genetic and chemical profiles. Second, we will identify and test isolated compounds in replicated greenhouse trials. Third, we will seek approval for set-up and field-testing of lethal compounds at SRS experimental forests, across states and ecophysiographic regions. Lastly, and perhaps the most challenging and ambitious step, is developing a method for chemical synthesis and scaling-up the process for the treatment and extirpation of large infestations of these invasive plant species, without nontarget impacts, in forested ecosystems on both public and private lands.

Dr. Shiyou Li, Stephen F. Austin University and DR. Rima Lucardi, USFS Southern Research Station 

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