Blog

Tuesday, July 20th, 2021

FICMNEW Public Meeting - Thursday, July 29, 1:00 - 2:30 pm EDT / 11:00 am - 12:30 pm MDT - Discussion/Agenda Items

The format of the quarterly FICMNEW public meetings will be as follows:

  • 30-45 min presentation on topic of importance to invasive plant / noxious weed management community
  • 15 min Q&A on the presentation
  • Discussion items to bring forth to the group
  • Participant (agency, organization) round robin

If there is a topic that is important for the group to know about, we can add this as an agenda item to assure that is discussed during the call. If you have an agenda item to contribute, please send it to co-chairs Eric Bradley (eric.bradley@hq.doe.gov) and Terri Hogan (terri_hogan@nps.gov). We will add it to the agenda for discussion as we are able.

Wednesday, July 14th, 2021

NatureServe is hiring a new chief botanist. For FICMNEW members and friends who may be interested in this position, here is the link to the job announcement:
https://app.trinethire.com/companies/31463-natureserve/jobs/42764-chief-botanist

Thursday, July 8th, 2021

1) FICMNEW Public Meetings Restart on a Quarterly Basis - Presentation Thursday, July 29, 1:00 - 2:30 pm EDT / 11:00 am - 12:30 pm MDT

Please join us for the restart of FICMNEW public meetings. They will be held quarterly beginning Thursday, July 29, 1:00 - 2:30 pm EDT / 11:00 am - 12:30 pm MDT. Meeting will include a 30-45 minute presentation and Q&A on a topic of interest to the invasive plant and noxious weed management community and will be followed by sharing of information among participants to facilitate working together on management, tool development, training and learning opportunities, and much more.

July presentation:  

USDA Plants Database: New and Improved, Christine Taliga-Burton, Plant Ecologist, National Plant Data Team, USDA, Natural Resources Conservation Service

The much-anticipated release of the USDA PLANTS Database update to version 3 occurred the end of April 2021.  Christine Taliga is a plant ecologist on the National Plant Data Team (NPDT) and will provide an overview of the new website including future areas of design and integration.  The mission of PLANTS is to assist with the integration of Natural Resource based information throughout NRCS and across government agencies, disciplines, and applications.The PLANTS Database, managed by the National Plant Data Team (NPDT), provides standardized information about the vascular plants, mosses, liverworts, hornworts, and lichens of North America north of Mexico and all U.S. territories and protectorates. Vascular plant distributions are mapped at the state and province level, and by U.S. county. The database includes accepted scientific names, plant symbols, checklists, distributional data, nativity, invasive and noxious status sources, species abstracts, characteristics, images, crop information, interactive identification keys, automated tools, references and web links. This information primarily promotes land conservation in the United States and its territories, but academic, educational, and general use is encouraged.


Join by meeting number 

Meeting number (access code): 199 942 9419 

Meeting password: PwMn9WsP2H7   


2) National Park Service (NPS) Integrated Pest Management Virtual Training Series for July

Below is the registration for the July NPS IPM webinar series, which is focused on finishing out the 11-step NPS IPM Process. The last 5 steps cover action thresholds, the IPM toolkit, implementing low-risk highly effective strategies, adaptive management, and outreach & education. 

We are kicking things off with a review of action thresholds from Brent Johnson, the NPS Regional Vegetation Ecologist and Regional IPM Program Manager for Interior Regions 8, 9, 10, & 12!

Listed below are the themes for the upcoming months:

August - More Pest Specifics and ToolsSeptember - Rodent Management

Updated information and links to the recordings, slides, and quizzes can also be found on the public facing website on the NPS Common Learning Portal so feel free to share the link (https://mylearning.nps.gov/training-courses/integrated-pest-management-virtual-training-series/) with partners in the coming days! Or you can find the recordings on the IPM Playlist directly on YouTube here (https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLVTxS3kud19RhQAWh3wlxWSAcAJrzFZbX).

Lastly, feel free to send any questions, or topics and suggestions for future webinars, to this email address, IPM@nps.gov or post them in the IPM Common Learning Portal forum.



Friday, July 2, 2021

According to Greenwire, Secretary of the Interior Debra Haaland revealed to members of the Western Governors' Association that Interior, along with the Commerce and Agriculture departments, is working to revive the Invasive Species Advisory Committee, the non-federal FACA committee that advises the National Invasive Species Council. The Trump administration put that organization on "inactive status" in September 2019, citing a "lack of resources."


Wednesday, June 23, 2021

NE RISCC Review of Invasive Plant Regulations across the US

Research led by Northeast Regional Invasive Species & Climate Change (RISCC) Management Network team members Eve Beaury and Emily Fusco evaluates the current landscape of invasive plant regulations across U.S. states. We've got a lot of room for improvement  - especially in addressing the need to prohibit range-shifting invasive plants before they arrive.

Beaury, E.M., E.J. Fusco, J.M. Allen, and B.A. Bradley (2021) “Invasive plant regulations in the United States are reactive and inconsistent”, Journal of Applied Ecology 

Reactive and Inconsistent Practices Hamstring Efforts to Manage Invasive Plants in the United States 

New research from UMass Amherst suggests that communication is the key to success

(Press Release) AMHERST, Mass. – As summer unfolds, more than 500 species of invasive plants will be taking root in fields, lawns, and gardens across the U.S. As plants continue to move north driven by climate change, the number of invasives will only increase. Unfortunately, inconsistent regulations that vary from state to state means that invasive plants have an edge on our attempts to control them. However, new research from the University of Massachusetts Amherst recently published in the Journal of Applied Ecology suggests that we already have an answer in hand – communication.

“We know that invasive plants are causing both ecological and economic harm in the U.S.,” says Emily Fusco, one of the paper’s lead authors and a postdoctoral research fellow in the department of environmental conservation at UMass. One of the best tools that invasive-species managers have are prohibited plant lists, which are compiled and maintained by state and county-level officials to prevent intentional introductions of known invasive and weedy plants. Unfortunately, a lack of overall coordination lends a patchwork quality to efforts to control invasive plants.

The study’s authors found that states in the lower 48 have listed anywhere between zero invasive plants and 162. Even worse, contiguous states often regulate very different sets of species: on average, only 20% of the plants listed as invasive in one state will show up on their neighbors’ lists. Finally, states are failing to get ahead of emerging invasive plants: 90% of the time states only list a plant as invasive once it has already become present in their state, making it more difficult to eradicate. “We’re missing an opportunity to prevent invasions before the species are widespread,” says Fusco. “These prohibited plant lists are one of the most useful tools we have for preventing plant invasions, but our work shows that states are not creating these lists in a proactive way.”

Yet, there’s a bright side to all this: “It’s not that the states are doing a bad job,” says Evelyn Beaury, the paper’s other lead author and a graduate student in organismic and evolutionary biology at UMass. “We don’t need to reinvent the wheel – we just need to have more conversations about what happens across state borders. We need to give managers the infrastructure and resources to work together.”

In fact, such work is already happening at the Northeast RISCC Network. RISCC (Regional Invasive Species and Climate Change) is a coalition of invasive species managers from throughout the Northeast who work with researchers and each other to identify and respond to new threats posed by invasives in a changing climate. “State officials want to improve coordination and share resources across borders,” says Bethany Bradley, senior author and professor of environmental conservation at UMass. Bradley is also one of the cofounders of RISCC and says that the invasive species managers she works with through the network “are thrilled to have more ways to exchange information.”

“We have a real chance to get ahead of the climate change/invasive species curve,” says Beaury. “We need to get more people on board and that begins with starting conversations that cross state borders.”

Contacts: Evelyn Beaury, ebeaury@umass.edu

                   Daegan Miller, drmiller@umass.edu

 

Wednesday, June 16, 2021


The U.S. Geological Survey's Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database (NAS) presents a seminar series focused on providing undergraduate students and early career scientists insight into federal career options as well as how various federal agencies work on invasive species issues nationwide. The seminars are on Wednesdays and Fridays, and run from July 9th through August 20th.

At the provided link below, you will find the list of seminar speakers and signup options. Please sign up for each seminar you would like to attend. All seminars start at 3 pm (eastern) on the dates displayed. A Microsoft Team invite will be emailed to you with instructions on how to log on to the seminars.

Webinar series registration link:

https://forms.gle/vQKA4ivvaHs3d85M9

Weed burner train
Tuesday, June 15, 2021

Thanks to Russ Jones, retired EPA FICMNEW representative, for this image he found on Facebook. He says that it is an image of a weed burner train, from National Geographic, but we couldn't find it there:

Pale-colored photograph of railroad tracks and a small train with what appears to be flame throwers burning the weeds away.

NPS June 24th Webinar
Tuesday, June 8th, 2021

National Park Service - JUNE 24th IPM WEBINAR - Integrated Pest Management Virtual Training Series (June)

We are fast approaching the halfway point of the year-long NPS IPM Webinar Series! As such, we have a special presentation planned for Session #26. The NPS IPM Program and the NPS Connected Conservation community are crossing over and jointly hosting a webinar titled, "Biological Control Across the Landscapes We Manage: What Agents Are Established and What New Tools Are on The Horizon" presented by Joseph Milan of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM)!

Joseph “Joey” Milan is a Boise, Idaho native. Joey graduated from the College of Idaho with a BS in Biology and the University of Idaho where he completed his MS in Entomology. Upon completion of his MS, Joey began working at his present position as a Biological Control Specialist with the BLM. At his present post, he serves as the interagency coordinator for biological control, assisting weed control practitioners in their Integrated Weed Management approach by providing technical assistance and monitoring of past releases as well as organizing new collections and additional potential release sites.

A public facing website on the NPS Common Learning Portal will be updated and live in a couple of days, so feel free to share the link (https://mylearning.nps.gov/training-courses/integrated-pest-management-virtual-training-series/) with partners in the coming days!

Also, feel free to send any questions, or topics and suggestions for future webinars, to this email address, IPM@nps.gov or post them in the IPM Common Learning Portal forum.



Monday, June 7th, 2021

 

A public facing website on the NPS Common Learning Portal will be updated and live in a couple of days, so feel free to share the link (https://mylearning.nps.gov/training-courses/integrated-pest-management-virtual-training-series/) with partners in the coming days!

Upcoming National Park Service's Integrated Pest Management Webinars

#23: Bed Bug IPM

Jim Pieper, NPS
06/07 @ 12:00pm MT
After a nearly six decade lull, the ongoing resurgence of bed bugs is enough to make your skin crawl. Even worse, resistance to various insecticides has been documented across the world. As the National Park Service continues to draw visitors from a worldwide crowd, we are likely seeing resistant individuals being introduced in our parks. So what do we do?

#24: Tickborne Disease Prevention for the NPS Community

Stefanie Campbell, NPS/USPHS
06/17 @ 11:00am MT
This presentation will include: basic facts about ticks and background information, preventing ticks and tickborne diseases, and reporting tick bites or tickborne illness.

Please send your questions, comments and feedback to: james_c_howard@nps.gov

FICMNEW public meetings
Friday, May 7th, 2021

FICMNEW PUBLIC MEETINGS BEGIN AGAIN!

Join us for the restart of FICMNEW Public Meetings! These virtual gatherings and learning and sharing opportunities will be held quarterly on the last Thursday of the months of July, October, January, and April. We are in the process of scheduling presentations into the early part of calendar year 2022. Presentation information will be posted on the FICMNEW website - FICMNEW home page.

Help us spread the word and please contact us with ideas for presentations and discussions related to invasive plant and noxious weed issues. What topics would benefit you in your work? What gaps in information is needed to help you? What interesting work is being done that we should all know about? 

Contact Terri Hogan at terri_hogan@nps.gov or Eric Bradley at eric.bradley@hq.doe.gov with suggestions of topics and presenters.

Our first public meeting:

  • WHEN:  Thursday, July 29, 2021, 1:00 pm EDT/11:00 am MDT
  • WHAT:  USDA Plants Database: New and Improved
  • WHO:  Christine Taliga-Burton, Plant Ecologist, National Plant Data Team, USDA, Natural Resources Conservation Service
  • CALL-IN/LOG-IN INFORMATION:  TBD


Tuesday, May 4th, 2021 (May the 4th be with you)


#NAISF2021

 

As we've posted before, the North American Invasive Species Forum is an international event encompassing the interests of professionals and organizations involved in invasive species management, research, and regulation across North America. The Forum will bring together the international invasive species community and will highlight new research, emerging issues, success stories and prevention and response initiatives from across Canada, Mexico and the U.S.. The forum will also build on the previous North American Invasive Species Forum held in 2017.

The Canadian Council on Invasive Species is hosting this Forum with the support of, and guidance from, an international steering committee representing the U.S., Canada, and Mexico.

FOR MORE DETAILS, VISIT: 2021 North American Invasive Species Forum - May 18, 2021

Indigenous Peoples Scholarship Program 2021

In preparation for the upcoming NAISF in May 2021, a special scholarship opportunity is being created to encourage and support increased participation by indigenous/tribal communities, with the goal of strengthening the dialog related to prevention and control of invasive species which threaten the environment, economies, cultures, and plant and animal health (particularly human health) on the lands and waters of indigenous people and across the landscape.  Opportunities to expand programs for invasive species management, including job-creating programs supporting research, prevention, control, detection and monitoring, restoration, and communications are expected to be discussed during the Forum.

Indigenous/tribal participation is critical for this continental dialog and will help bring the perspectives and solutions needed from indigenous communities.  Through the scholarship program, there will be no NAISF conference registration fee charges for indigenous participants (limited number of registrations available). To apply, please email Kellie.

Support Provided by:  The Office of Tribal Relations – USDA Forest Service

First Day Featured Sessions

Tracking the rapid spread of invasive wild pigs in Canada and their impacts on Species at Risk
Ryan Brook

There are no native pigs in Canada; they were first introduced by importing domestic Wild Boar to most provinces in the 1980s and 1990s to create meat farms and high fences shoot farms. These animals were crossed with domestic pig breeds in order to producer larger animals with larger litters. Over the last 40 years there have been numerous cases of escapes and purposeful releases of animals to the wild. Invasive wild pig populations have spread out from farm sites to now occupy large areas of Western Canada. Using ten different methods, we have documented a total of 54,929 occurrences of wild pigs, with 99% of all occurrences in Alberta (11%), Saskatchewan (53%), and Manitoba (35%) and isolated pockets of occurrences of the remaining 1% in British Columbia, Ontario, and Quebec. Wild pigs have expanded exponentially and have established core strongholds in each of the three Prairie Provinces and there is considerable spatial overlap with species at risk, including boreal caribou, prairie skinks, and piping plover creating important risks and impacts related to predation, habitat destruction, and potential disease transmission.

Strawberry Blossom Weevil, Anthonomus rubi (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is established in British Columbia, Canada
Michelle Franklin1, Paul Abram1, and Tracy Hueppelsheuser2

1Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Agassiz Research and Development Centre, 6947 Highway 7, P.O. Box 1000, Agassiz, British Columbia, V0M 1A0, Canada

2British Columbia Ministry of Agriculture, Plant Health Unit, 1767 Angus Campbell Road, Abbotsford, BC V3G 2M3

We report the establishment of the strawberry blossom weevil, Anthonomus rubi (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in British Columbia, Canada. This is the first detection of A. rubi, outside of its native range which includes Europe, Asia, and North Africa. This weevil is a serious pest of Rosaceae and is of potential concern for strawberry and raspberry production in British Columbia.  This weevil directly impacts fruit yield, as adult female weevils damage developing flower buds by laying their eggs inside the closed, green buds and severing the flower stalks below. Here we describe the current distribution of A. rubi in its new range, observed host plant associations, and observations of an associated larval parasitoid from the genus Pteromalus (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) that could hold potential as a naturally occurring biocontrol agent in the future. 

Addressing Hemlock Woolly Adelgid in Michigan
Drew Raynor

Hemlock woolly adelgid has killed hundreds of thousands of hemlock trees in eastern states, including significant areas in the Appalachian and Great Smoky mountains.  When infestations began spreading in West Michigan, a team of technicians went to work to "hold the line" through rigorous survey and treatment of infested trees in an effort to save Michigan's 170 million eastern hemlocks from the same fate.  Join Drew Rayner, the West Michigan Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Coordinator, to learn how federal, state and local resources are coming together to save Michigan's hemlock resource, one tree at a time.

Additional Sessions

  • Human-caused Climate Change, Vegetation, and invasive species, Patrick Gonzalez
  • Mexico's Progress and Commitment to Comprehensive Island Restoration, Federico Mendez
  • E-commerce: Plant Health Implications and the Importance of Collaboration, Cory Marker and Bruno Gallant
  • Networking opportunities
  • Horizon Scanning and Bio surveillance
  • Three concurrent sessions focused on aquatic, terrestrial and insects and animals
  • Keynotes from Australia, New Zealand and the US

VISIT: Session details can be accessed here.

 Register Now!


We also have funding to support FREE indigenous and tribal attendance as well as a new youth ticket for only $10 (age 30 and under!) Details are as follows:

  • CCIS Member Price (full forum - 3 days): $170
  • CCIS Non-Member Price (full forum - 3 days): $200
  • CCIS Member/Non-Member (one day only): $75
  • Indigenous/tribal bursary (full forum): FREE! Limited quantities available!
  • Youth (under 30): ONLY $10! Limited quantities available!

PLEASE NOTE: Registration for all tickets will end May 17th at 12 noon.

 

To REGISTER, visit here: https://pheedloop.com/register/northamericaninvasives2021/attendee/

 

NAISF IS STILL ACCEPTING SPONSORS!


Sponsors will benefit from premium visibility among guests of the Forum. Your organization will be profiled in a variety of ways, depending on the level you choose. We have Gold, Silver and Bronze opportunities available and can work with you to suit your needs. Promote your organization to a North American audience while supporting efforts to protect communities and landscapes from invasive species! Email Kellie to learn more!

 

SEE OUR LIST OF SPONSORS HERE: https://pheedloop.com/northamericaninvasives2021/site/sponsors/

  


Kellie Sherman, Coordinator

Canadian Council on Invasive Species

Workdays: Monday – Friday
(249) 353-2247
coordinator@canadainvasives.ca
http://www.canadainvasives.ca

 

The Canadian Council on Invasive Species gratefully acknowledges the territories of the
Indigenous Peoples of Canada where we live and work to maintain healthy ecosystems for all.

Thursday, April 22, 2021 (Earth Day)

NPS IPM Webinar Series

James Howard, NPS, will present Session #13 of NPS' Integrated Pest Management Webinar Series, on the 2021 Enhancements to the NPS PUPS database on Tuesday, April 27th at 12:00pm MT. Additionally, the final session for the month, Session #17, will be on Pesticide Storage, Container Management, and PPE as presented by Kenneth Morin, the CASHE (Compliance Assessment - Safety, Health, and the Environment) program lead with the Bureau of Land Management! And don't forget about the upcoming Session #16 on Hazard Communication by Joe Jacobs, Regional Safety Manager in NPS/Interior Region 2!

Listed below are the themes for the upcoming months:
May: the 11-step IPM Process
June: Pest Specifics

A public facing website on the NPS Common Learning Portal with links to register for the trainings is located here (https://mylearning.nps.gov/training-courses/integrated-pest-management-virtual-training-series/).


Tuesday, April 20th, 2021

Four Priority areas to advance invasion science in the face of rapid environmental change

Link to pdf article:  https://cdnsciencepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1139/er-2020-0088

Authors: Anthony Ricciardi, Josephine C. Iacarella, David C. Aldridge, Tim M. Blackburn, James T. Carlton, Jane A. Catford, Jaimie T.A. Dick, Philip E. Hulme, Jonathan M. Jeschke, Andrew M. Liebhold,
Julie L. Lockwood, Hugh J. MacIsaac, Laura A. Meyerson, Petr Pyšek, David M. Richardson, Gregory M. Ruiz, Daniel Simberloff, Montserrat Vilà, and David A. Wardle

Unprecedented rates of introduction and spread of non-native species pose burgeoning challenges to biodiversity, natural resource management, regional economies, and human health. Current biosecurity efforts are failing to keep pace with globalization, revealing critical gaps in our understanding and response to invasions. Here, we identify four priority areas to advance invasion science in the face of rapid global environmental change.

Friday, April 16th, 2021

https://www.northcountrypublicradio.org/news/story/43550/20210409/do-nothing-about-invasive-plants

Yes, there really is an invasive plant that is better left alone: Garlic mustard. For details, click the link here above to read the article featuring a study by Cornell University's Berndt Blossey.

Friday, April 16th, 2021

#NAISF2021

 

The North American Invasive Species Forum is an international event encompassing the interests of professionals and organizations involved in invasive species management, research, and regulation across North America.

The Forum will bring together the international invasive species community and will highlight new research, emerging issues, success stories and prevention and response initiatives from across Canada, Mexico and the U.S.. The forum will also build on the previous North American Invasive Species Forum held in 2017.

The Canadian Council on Invasive Species is hosting this Forum with the support of, and guidance from, an international steering committee representing the U.S., Canada, and Mexico.

 

VISIT: 2021 North American Invasive Species Forum - May 18, 2021

 

We are very excited to present a wide variety of speakers, sessions and topics for the 2021 North American Invasive Species Forum! Above are just a few of our speakers from across North America, discussing a wide variety of topics including but not limited to:

  • Strawberry Blossom Weevil, Anthonomus rubi (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is established in British Columbia, Canada,  Michelle Franklin
  • Human-caused Climate Change, Vegetation, and invasive species, Patrick Gonzalez
  • Mexico's Progress and Commitment to Comprehensive Island Restoration, Federico Mendez
  • E-commerce: Plant Health Implications and the Importance of Collaboration, Cory Marker and Bruno Gallant

Other sessions and topics:

  • Networking opportunities
  • Horizon Scanning and Bio surveillance
  • Three concurrent sessions focused on aquatic, terrestrial and insects and animals
  • Keynotes from Australia, New Zealand and the US

VISIT: 2021 North American Invasive Species Forum - May 18, 2021

 

Register Now - Early Bird Registration Ends April 23rd!


We also have funding to support FREE indigenous and tribal attendance as well as a new youth ticket for only $10 (30 and under!) Details are as follows:

  • CCIS Member Price (full forum - 3 days): $140 (until April 23rd)
  • CCIS Non-Member Price (full forum - 3 days): $170 (until April 23rd)
  • CCIS Member/Non-Member (one day only): $55 (until April 23rd)
  • Indigenous/tribal bursary (full forum): FREE! Limited quantities available!
  • Youth (under 30): ONLY $10! Limited quantities available!

PLEASE NOTE: Registration for all tickets will end May 17th at 12 noon.

 

WE ARE STILL ACCEPTING SPONSORS!


Sponsors will benefit from premium visibility among guests of the Forum. Your organization will be profiled in a variety of ways, depending on the level you choose. We have Gold, Silver and Bronze opportunities available and can work with you to suit your needs. Promote your organization to a North American audience while supporting efforts to protect communities and landscapes from invasive species! Email Kellie at coordinator@canadainvasives.ca to learn more!

  

Kellie Sherman

Coordinator

Canadian Council on Invasive Species

 

Workdays: Monday – Friday
  (249) 353-2247
  coordinator@canadainvasives.ca
  http://www.canadainvasives.ca

 

The Canadian Council on Invasive Species gratefully acknowledges the territories of the
Indigenous Peoples of Canada where we live and work to maintain healthy ecosystems for all.