Blog

Friday, May 7th, 2021

FICMNEW PUBLIC MEETINGS BEGIN AGAIN!

Join us for the restart of FICMNEW Public Meetings! These virtual gatherings and learning and sharing opportunities will be held quarterly on the last Thursday of the months of July, October, January, and April. We are in the process of scheduling presentations into the early part of calendar year 2022. Presentation information will be posted on the FICMNEW website - FICMNEW home page.

Help us spread the word and please contact us with ideas for presentations and discussions related to invasive plant and noxious weed issues. What topics would benefit you in your work? What gaps in information is needed to help you? What interesting work is being done that we should all know about? 

Contact Terri Hogan at terri_hogan@nps.gov or Eric Bradley at eric.bradley@hq.doe.gov with suggestions of topics and presenters.

Our first public meeting:

  • WHEN:  Thursday, July 29, 2021, 1:00 pm EDT/11:00 am MDT
  • WHAT:  USDA Plants Database: New and Improved
  • WHO:  Christine Taliga-Burton, Plant Ecologist, National Plant Data Team, USDA, Natural Resources Conservation Service
  • CALL-IN/LOG-IN INFORMATION:  TBD



NATIONAL INVASIVE SPECIES COUNCIL BI-WEEKLY UPDATE - MAY 6, 2021


NISC News 

 

Rapid Response-Federal Agency Roles and Responsibilities:  NISC Staff need to review and compile agency comments on the present draft, the results of which will be provided to the task team for further discussion.  

Rapid Response-Emergency Fund:  NISC Staff need to review and compile agency comments on the present draft, the results of which will be provided to the task team for further discussion on finalizing the report for clearance.  

eDNA:  NISC staff are initiating a two-stage clearance process for the white paper developed by the task team. The first stage is a technical peer review as required by several agencies (6 weeks) followed by the second stage which is a more formal agency review (3 weeks).   

Wildland Fire and Invasive Species (NISC/WFLC):  NISC staff have distributed the revised the goals and opportunities section of the initial report to the task team. A meeting to discuss the results is being scheduled for late May/early June. 

Information Management: Based on additional discussions among the informal group of federal experts on invasive species data and information, NISC staff is pursuing three outcomes: a briefing paper on relevant types of invasive species information and data held by federal programs and how it supports management efforts; support to USDA’s National Agricultural Library on the content and structure of www.invasivespeciesinfo.gov; and intersections with the four major aggregators of invasive species occurrence data

Advanced Biotechnology:  The Community of Practice (CoP) held its most recent webinar on May 5, focusing on the work of the Genetic Biocontrol of Invasive Rodents on Islands (GBIRd) Program in developing genetic control technologies for invasive species control through a broad international partnership. 

Crosscut Budget NISC staff await the public release of the President’s proposed budget for FY2022, at which time they will issue a request to NISC member agencies for data on their invasive species spending. In addition to FY 2020 Actual, FY 2021 Enacted and FY 2022 President’s Budget expenditures, this year’s exercise will include invasive species-related spending from COVID-19 appropriations.  

New Detection 

Invasive Seaweed Found in Newport Bay, CA:  Multiple federal, state and local agencies have been notified of an invasive algae species discovered in Newport Bay, Calif. The algae, which is native to Florida and other subtropical and tropical locales, is scientifically known as Caulerpa prolifera. It can grow quickly, choking out native seaweeds and potentially harming marine life through lost habitat. The unusual patch of algae discovered by a diver in Newport Bay was eventually identified by the California Department of Food and Agriculture which alerted other agencies. 

https://cdfgnews.wordpress.com/2021/04/22/invasive-seaweed-found-in-newport-bay/ 

Policy and Law 

Center for Biological Diversity. April 2021. Biden Administration Urged to Use Lacey Act to Ban Wildlife Imports That May Spread Disease. 

Science and Technology Publications 

  • Bennett S, et al. 2021. Climate-Driven Impacts of Exotic Species on Marine Ecosystems. Global Ecology and Biogeography 30:5 1043–55. https://doi.org/10.1111/geb.13283: Our findings highlight how temperature and climatic context influence ecological impacts by exotic species in marine ecosystems and the implications for existing and novel species interactions under climate change. Temperature is fundamental to the physiological and ecological performance of marine organisms, but its role in modulating the magnitude of ecological impacts by exotic species remains unresolved. Here, we examine the relationship between thermal regimes in the range of origin of marine exotic species and sites of measured impact, after human‐induced introduction. We compare this relationship with the magnitude of impact exerted by exotic species on native ecosystems. Quantitative impacts of exotic species in marine ecosystems were obtained from a global database. The native range of origin of exotic species was used to estimate the realized thermal niche for each species and compared with the latitude and climatic conditions in recipient sites of recorded impact of exotic species. The difference in median temperatures between recipient sites and the thermal range of origin (i.e., thermal midpoint anomaly) was compared with the magnitude of effect sizes by exotic species on native species, communities and ecosystems. Recorded impacts occurred predominantly within the thermal niche of origin of exotic species, albeit with a tendency toward higher latitudes and slightly cooler conditions. The severity of impacts by exotic species on abundance of native taxa displayed a hump‐shaped relationship with temperature. Peak impacts were recorded in recipient sites that were 2.2°C cooler than the thermal midpoint of the range of origin of exotic species, and impacts decreased in magnitude toward higher and lower thermal anomalies. 

  • Centre for Agriculture and Bioscience International (CABI) Annual Report 2020:  This report describes the progress of Action on Invasives during 2020, highlighting progress and lessons learned in each of the four work packages. It also reports evidence of outcomes of the program. 

  • Cheng TL, et al. 2021. The scope and severity of white‐nose syndrome on hibernating bats in North America. Conservation Biology https://doi.org/10.1111/cobi.13739 Assessing the scope and severity of threats is necessary for evaluating impacts on populations to inform conservation planning. Quantitative threat assessment often requires monitoring programs that provide reliable data over relevant spatial and temporal scales, yet such programs can be difficult to justify until there is an apparent stressor. Leveraging efforts of wildlife management agencies to record winter counts of hibernating bats, we collated data for 5 species from over 200 sites across 27 U.S. states and 2 Canadian provinces from 1995 to 2018 to determine the impact of white‐nose syndrome (WNS), a deadly disease of hibernating bats. We estimated declines of winter counts of bat colonies at sites where the invasive fungus that causes WNS (Pseudogymnoascus destructans) had been detected to assess the threat impact of WNS. Three species undergoing species status assessment by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Myotis septentrionalis, Myotis lucifugus, and Perimyotis subflavus) declined by more than 90%, which warrants classifying the severity of the WNS threat as extreme based on criteria used by NatureServe. The scope of the WNS threat as defined by NatureServe criteria was large (36% of Myotis lucifugus range) to pervasive (79% of Myotis septentrionalis range) for these species. Declines for 2 other species (Myotis sodalis and Eptesicus fuscus) were less severe but still qualified as moderate to serious based on NatureServe criteria. Data‐sharing across jurisdictions provided a comprehensive evaluation of scope and severity of the threat of WNS and indicated regional differences that can inform response efforts at international, national, and state or provincial jurisdictions. We assessed the threat impact of an emerging infectious disease by uniting monitoring efforts across jurisdictional boundaries and demonstrated the importance of coordinated monitoring programs, such as the North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat), for data‐driven conservation assessments and planning. 

  • Levers LR & Pradhananga AK. 2021. Recreationist willingness to pay for aquatic invasive species management. Plos one 16:4, e0246860 (https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0246860) We estimated willingness to pay for local aquatic invasive species lake management in the form of a daily lake access fee by conducting summer lake surveys in Minnesota, USA. Similar pairs of lakes with differing infestations of zebra mussels, Dreissena polymorpha, and starry stonewort, Nitellopsis obtuse, were used as study sites to infer how being at an infested lake vs. being at an uninfested lake and different local species would impact responses. We also examined recreationists’ visit motivation, and aquatic invasive species perceived risk, knowledge, and awareness of problem. We estimated mean willingness to pay about nine to ten dollars per day, which did not differ significantly by lake. Additionally, perceived risk, awareness of problem, and visit motivation were significant in predicting willingness to pay, which could have important ramifications for aquatic invasive species management. 

  • Pucherelli S, et al. 2021. Case Studies: Impact and Control of Invasive Mussels at Hydropower Plants, Bureau of Reclamation Science and Technology Program Research and Development Office, Final Report No. ST-2020-1876-01: Thirteen hydropower plants with invasive quagga or zebra mussel fouling were interviewed about their experience. Information was gathered about the size and operation of the facility, the mussel infestation timeline, the systems, and structures experiencing mussel fouling, the implemented control and mitigation methods, and the expenses associated with mussel management. The severity of mussel impacts was dependent on the design of the power plant and raw water usage. The size and number of generators was not indicative of the severity of impacts. The majority of plants interviewed do not completely track mussel specific maintenance and costs, therefore the estimates do not provide a complete picture of the costs associated with mussel infestations at hydropower plants. These case studies provide valuable information to managers at plants preparing for the potential arrival of dreissenid mussels. 

  • Breinlinger, S. et al. 2021. Hunting the eagle killer: A cyanobacterial neurotoxin causes vacuolar myelinopathy. Science  26 Mar 2021: Vol. 371, Issue 6536, eaax9050, DOI: 10.1126/science.aax9050: Although many human activities have clear negative effects on the natural world, there are also unforeseen consequences. Bald eagle mass death events in the southeastern United States may be one such downstream effect of human activity. After considerable effort, Breinlinger et al. identified the cause of these events as an insidious combination of factors. Colonization of waterways by an invasive, introduced plant provided a substrate for the growth of a previously unidentified cyanobacterium. Exposure of this cyanobacterium to bromide, typically anthropogenic in origin, resulted in the production of a neurotoxin that both causes neuropathy in animals that prey on the plants and also bioaccumulates to kill predators such as bald eagles. 

  • Tsiamis K, et al. 2021.Marine Strategy Framework Directive - Descriptor 2, Non-Indigenous Species, Delivering solid recommendations for setting threshold values for non-indigenous species pressure on European seas, EUR 30640 EN, Publications Office of the European Union, Luxembourg, 2021, ISBN 978-92-76-32257-3, doi:10.2760/035071, JRC124136: This publication is a Science for Policy report by the Joint Research Centre, the European Commission’s science and knowledge service. It aims to provide evidence-based scientific support to the European policymaking process.  

  • Marine Non-Indigenous Species (NIS) are animals and plants introduced accidently or deliberately into the European seas, originating from other seas of the globe. About 800 marine non-indigenous species (NIS) currently occur in the European Union national marine waters, several of which have negative impacts on marine ecosystem services and biodiversity. Under the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) Descriptor 2 (D2), EU Member States (MSs) need to consider NIS in their marine management strategies. The report calls for a number of different categories of NIS to be reported in D2 assessments, pointing the need for the species to be labelled/categorized appropriately in the MSFD reporting by the MSs. 

  • Williams F, et al. 2021. Assessment of the Use and Benefits of the Invasive Species Compendium. CABI Working Paper 20, 46 pp. https://dx.doi.org/10.1079/cabicomm-62-8147: The use of information and communication technology, including e-resources, to deliver information has expanded rapidly in recent years. They have certain advantages including quick access to relevant and current information that may not be available through other means. There are several online resources that provide information about invasive species including the Invasive Species Compendium (ISC). There has been limited work to assess these websites, including whether they provide up-to-date information, the extent of their global coverage, and how users perceive their usefulness. This study assesses such factors for the ISC, analyzing usage statistics, data from three user surveys and information from key informant interviews. Findings show that the ISC is highly valued by users, in particular researchers, and that the information is up to date, reliable, and open access, which is of particular value to those working in the Global South. While considerable use of the ISC is to seek out information related to invasive species, it is apparent that other users explore the website to discover information to help manage crop pests and diseases. Key feedback included how users access datasheets within the ISC, and the low level of awareness of the resource. Going forward, it is critical that the ISC can remain as an open access resource, with sufficient funding to ensure it is continuously updated. This will enable researchers in the Global South to continue to access key data and literature, while concentrating resources on fieldwork, pest risk analysis, management, and control. 

  • Hydrobiologia - Special Issue on Aquatic Invasive Species III. (2021) 848:9. Issue editors: KE Kovalenko, FM Pelicice, LB Kats, J Kotta, SM Thomaz. Contents: 
    • Aquatic invasive species: introduction to the Special Issue and dynamics of public interest (Kovalenki KE, et al.) 
    • Aquaculture facilities drive the introduction and establishment of non-native Oreochromis niloticus populations in Neotropical streams (Forneck SC , et al.) 
    • Online auction marketplaces as a global pathway for aquatic invasive species (Olden JD, et al.) 
    • In-water and dry-dock hull fouling assessments reveal high risk for regional translocation of nonindigenous species in the southwestern Atlantic (Meloni M, et al.) 
    • Risk screening of the potential invasiveness of non-native marine crustacean decapods and barnacles in the Mediterranean Sea (Stasolla G, et al.) 
    • Non-indigenous species along the Israeli Mediterranean coast: tally, policy, outlook (Galil BS, et al.) 
    • Water temperature and lake size explain Darwin’s conundrum for fish establishment in boreal lakes (Rocha BS, et al.) 
    • Hydrological connectivity drives the propagule pressure of Limnoperna fortunei (Dunker, 1857) in a tropical river–floodplain system (Ernandes de Amo V, et al.) 
    • Using richness of native and non-native aquatic species along a climatic gradient to test the intermediate disturbance hypothesis (Santos LN, et al.) 
    • Variation of thermal plasticity for functional traits between populations of an invasive aquatic plant from two climatic regions (Thiébaut G, et al.) 
    • Geographic distribution of Ophiothela brittle stars (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea): substrate use plasticity and implications for the silent invasion of O. mirabilis in the Atlantic (Tavares MR, et al.) 
    • The drifting dinoflagellate Ceratium furcoides (Levander) Langhans 1925: fundamental niche shift during global invasion (Macêdo RL, et al.) 
    • From introduction to nuisance growth: a review of traits of alien aquatic plants which contribute to their invasiveness (Hussner A, et al.) 
    • Life history variation in space and time: environmental and seasonal responses of a parthenogenetic invasive freshwater snail in northern Germany (Verhaegen G, et al.) 
    • Parasite infection reflects host genetic diversity among non-native populations of pumpkinseed sunfish in Europe (Ondračková M, et al.) 
    • The invasion of an alien characiform fish and the decline of a native congener in a Neotropical river-floodplain system (Ganassin MJM, et al.) 
    • Comparative functional responses predict the predatory impact of the highly invasive fish Cichla kelberi (Carvalho TL, et al.) 
    • Parasitism and fitness of invaders: oligochaete Chaetogaster limnaei produces gill damage and increased respiration rates in freshwater Asian clams (Liquin F, et al.) 
    • Traits and impacts of introduced species: a quantitative review of meta-analyses (Boltovskoy D, et al.) 
    • Towards global dominance of invasive alien plants in freshwater ecosystems: the dawn of the Exocene? (Bolpagni R, et al.) 
    • Testing the short-term effects of a fish invader on the trophic ecology of a closely related species (Amaral JR, et al.) 
    • Invasive potential of golden and zebra mussels in present and future climatic scenarios in the new world (Petsch DK, et al.) 
    • Moderate hydrological disturbance and high nutrient substrate enhance the performance of Myriophyllum aquaticum (Zhang X, et al.) 
    • Environmental nitrate impacts foraging and agonistic behaviours of invasive non-native crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus and Faxonius virilis) (James J, et al.) 
    • Differential use of artificial habitats by native and non-native fish species in Neotropical reservoirs (Frehse F, et al.) 
    • Stress tolerance of two freshwater invaders exposed to Microcystis aeruginosa and microcystin-LR (Boegehold AG, et al.) 
    • Hydrological alterations enhance fish invasions: lessons from a Neotropical coastal river (Macêdo dos Santos VL, et al.) 
    • Maintenance management and eradication of established aquatic invaders (Simberloff D) 
    • Rapid assessment of Dreissena population in Lake Erie using underwater videography (Karatayev AY, et al.) 

NISC  and Other Webinars 

 

NISC Advanced Biotechnology Community of Practice Webinar Series:  Recordings or slidedecks of NISC-hosted webinars listed below are available to Senior Advisers upon request:  

  • Advanced Biotechnology CoP  

    • Applications for Invasive Species Control - April 1, 2020 

    • Risk Assessment - June 3, 2020 

    • Policy and Law - August 5, 2020

    • Public Engagement and Social Issues - October 7, 2020

    • DOI Prize Challenge Winners - February 3, 2021 

    • Genetic Biocontrol of Invasive Rodents (GBIRd) Program (slidedeck only) - May 5, 2021 

  • Asian Giant Hornet Update – June 3, 2020 

Career Opportunities 

 

Paid Research Internship:  The USGS Guam Brown Treesnake Project team will be hiring up to four Research Associate I team members through the Research Corporation of the University of Guam (RCUoG). https://www.uog.edu/rcuog/job-announcements.php 

 

NAISMA Job Openings:  The North American Invasive Species Management Association (NAISMA) is hiring for the following positions:  1) Development Director; 2) Website and Learning Management System Administrator; 3)Accounting and Program Assistant.  

https://naisma.org/naisma-resources/employment/ 

 

Meeting and Conference Calendar 

(NOTE:  Events may be held virtually, rescheduled or cancelled due to COVID-19.) 

MAY 2021 

Society for the Study of Marine Bioinvasions (SSMB) International Conference XI:  Annapolis, MD, May 10-14, 2022 (in-person). Hosted by the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center’s Marine Invasions Lab. Information on meeting themes, guest speakers, special events, student travel funds, and local attractions will be posted on our website over the coming months at www.marinebioinvasions.info 

2021 North American Invasive Species Forum:  May 18-20, 2021 (virtual). The North American Invasive Species Forum is an international event encompassing the interests of professionals and organizations involved in invasive species management, research, and regulation across North America. The Forum will bring together the international invasive species community and will highlight new research, emerging issues, success stories and prevention and response initiatives from across Canada, Mexico and the U.S., and also build on the previous North American Invasive Species Forum held in 2017. The Canadian Council on Invasive Species is hosting this Forum with the support of, and guidance from, an international steering committee representing the U.S., Canada, and Mexico.  

Register:  https://pheedloop.com/northamericaninvasives2021/site/home/  

Invasive Species Wikipedia Edit-A-Thon:  May 20, 2021 (virtual). Learn to edit Wikipedia and help improve articles about invasive species. The event will begin with an introduction and information about the Information Center and invasive species from Joyce Bolton, head of the National Invasive Species Information Center, and other guest speakers from USDA. Jamie Flood, Wikipedian-in-residence of National Agricultural Library and Ariel Cetrone of Wikimedia D.C. will lead a one-hour training on Wikipedia editing. The rest of the day will be spent updating invasive species articles on Wikipedia. During the event, experienced editors and Invasive Species experts will be on hand to assist and answer questions. 

Register:  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/invasive-species-wikipedia-edit-a-thon-tickets-151983457613 

JUNE 2021 

Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force (ANSTF) Meeting:  June 28-30, 2021 (virtual). The meeting will be held in the afternoon each day (ET). Details forthcoming. 

SEPTEMBER 2021 

NAISMA Annual Conference:  September 27-30, 2021 (virtual and in-person). This year’s conference will focus on transboundary cooperation. The agenda to be released May 2021.  

Registration:  https://naisma.org/conferences/?mc_cid=fdac7b0b79&mc_eid=e7645bd6dc  

OCTOBER 2021 

California Invasive Plant Council (Cal-IPC) Symposium:  October 26-29, 2021 (virtual). Call for abstracts is now open for this year’s symposium, “Expanding Community to Protect Biodiversity”, celebrates Cal-IPC's 30-year anniversary. Deadline for abstracts is July 15. 2021.  

Registration (opens in May): https://www.cal-ipc.org/resources/symposium/  

NOVEMBER 2021 

Alaska Invasive Species Workshop:  November 3-4, 2021; Anchorage, AK (in-person and online). Sponsored by the Alaska Invasive Species Partnership. More information on registration and submitting abstracts will be provided in the coming weeks at https://uaf.edu/ces/invasives/akisp/ 

DECEMBER 2021 

Western Weed Coordinating Committee (WWCC) Annual Meeting:  December 7-9, 2021; Denver, CO (in-person w/virtual option). Agenda is currently in development. More details will be provided on the WWCC website as the meeting date approaches.   

MAY 2022 

Society for the Study of Marine Bioinvasions (SSMB) International Conference XI:  Annapolis, MD, May 10-14, 2022. Hosted by the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center’s Marine Invasions Lab. Information on meeting themes, guest speakers, special events, student travel funds, and local attractions will be posted on our website over the coming months at www.marinebioinvasions.info. 

Tuesday, May 4th, 2021 (May the 4th be with you)


#NAISF2021

 

As we've posted before, the North American Invasive Species Forum is an international event encompassing the interests of professionals and organizations involved in invasive species management, research, and regulation across North America. The Forum will bring together the international invasive species community and will highlight new research, emerging issues, success stories and prevention and response initiatives from across Canada, Mexico and the U.S.. The forum will also build on the previous North American Invasive Species Forum held in 2017.

The Canadian Council on Invasive Species is hosting this Forum with the support of, and guidance from, an international steering committee representing the U.S., Canada, and Mexico.

FOR MORE DETAILS, VISIT: 2021 North American Invasive Species Forum - May 18, 2021

Indigenous Peoples Scholarship Program 2021

In preparation for the upcoming NAISF in May 2021, a special scholarship opportunity is being created to encourage and support increased participation by indigenous/tribal communities, with the goal of strengthening the dialog related to prevention and control of invasive species which threaten the environment, economies, cultures, and plant and animal health (particularly human health) on the lands and waters of indigenous people and across the landscape.  Opportunities to expand programs for invasive species management, including job-creating programs supporting research, prevention, control, detection and monitoring, restoration, and communications are expected to be discussed during the Forum.

Indigenous/tribal participation is critical for this continental dialog and will help bring the perspectives and solutions needed from indigenous communities.  Through the scholarship program, there will be no NAISF conference registration fee charges for indigenous participants (limited number of registrations available). To apply, please email Kellie.

Support Provided by:  The Office of Tribal Relations – USDA Forest Service

First Day Featured Sessions

Tracking the rapid spread of invasive wild pigs in Canada and their impacts on Species at Risk
Ryan Brook

There are no native pigs in Canada; they were first introduced by importing domestic Wild Boar to most provinces in the 1980s and 1990s to create meat farms and high fences shoot farms. These animals were crossed with domestic pig breeds in order to producer larger animals with larger litters. Over the last 40 years there have been numerous cases of escapes and purposeful releases of animals to the wild. Invasive wild pig populations have spread out from farm sites to now occupy large areas of Western Canada. Using ten different methods, we have documented a total of 54,929 occurrences of wild pigs, with 99% of all occurrences in Alberta (11%), Saskatchewan (53%), and Manitoba (35%) and isolated pockets of occurrences of the remaining 1% in British Columbia, Ontario, and Quebec. Wild pigs have expanded exponentially and have established core strongholds in each of the three Prairie Provinces and there is considerable spatial overlap with species at risk, including boreal caribou, prairie skinks, and piping plover creating important risks and impacts related to predation, habitat destruction, and potential disease transmission.

Strawberry Blossom Weevil, Anthonomus rubi (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is established in British Columbia, Canada
Michelle Franklin1, Paul Abram1, and Tracy Hueppelsheuser2

1Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Agassiz Research and Development Centre, 6947 Highway 7, P.O. Box 1000, Agassiz, British Columbia, V0M 1A0, Canada

2British Columbia Ministry of Agriculture, Plant Health Unit, 1767 Angus Campbell Road, Abbotsford, BC V3G 2M3

We report the establishment of the strawberry blossom weevil, Anthonomus rubi (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in British Columbia, Canada. This is the first detection of A. rubi, outside of its native range which includes Europe, Asia, and North Africa. This weevil is a serious pest of Rosaceae and is of potential concern for strawberry and raspberry production in British Columbia.  This weevil directly impacts fruit yield, as adult female weevils damage developing flower buds by laying their eggs inside the closed, green buds and severing the flower stalks below. Here we describe the current distribution of A. rubi in its new range, observed host plant associations, and observations of an associated larval parasitoid from the genus Pteromalus (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) that could hold potential as a naturally occurring biocontrol agent in the future. 

Addressing Hemlock Woolly Adelgid in Michigan
Drew Raynor

Hemlock woolly adelgid has killed hundreds of thousands of hemlock trees in eastern states, including significant areas in the Appalachian and Great Smoky mountains.  When infestations began spreading in West Michigan, a team of technicians went to work to "hold the line" through rigorous survey and treatment of infested trees in an effort to save Michigan's 170 million eastern hemlocks from the same fate.  Join Drew Rayner, the West Michigan Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Coordinator, to learn how federal, state and local resources are coming together to save Michigan's hemlock resource, one tree at a time.

Additional Sessions

  • Human-caused Climate Change, Vegetation, and invasive species, Patrick Gonzalez
  • Mexico's Progress and Commitment to Comprehensive Island Restoration, Federico Mendez
  • E-commerce: Plant Health Implications and the Importance of Collaboration, Cory Marker and Bruno Gallant
  • Networking opportunities
  • Horizon Scanning and Bio surveillance
  • Three concurrent sessions focused on aquatic, terrestrial and insects and animals
  • Keynotes from Australia, New Zealand and the US

VISIT: Session details can be accessed here.

 Register Now!


We also have funding to support FREE indigenous and tribal attendance as well as a new youth ticket for only $10 (age 30 and under!) Details are as follows:

  • CCIS Member Price (full forum - 3 days): $170
  • CCIS Non-Member Price (full forum - 3 days): $200
  • CCIS Member/Non-Member (one day only): $75
  • Indigenous/tribal bursary (full forum): FREE! Limited quantities available!
  • Youth (under 30): ONLY $10! Limited quantities available!

PLEASE NOTE: Registration for all tickets will end May 17th at 12 noon.

 

To REGISTER, visit here: https://pheedloop.com/register/northamericaninvasives2021/attendee/

 

NAISF IS STILL ACCEPTING SPONSORS!


Sponsors will benefit from premium visibility among guests of the Forum. Your organization will be profiled in a variety of ways, depending on the level you choose. We have Gold, Silver and Bronze opportunities available and can work with you to suit your needs. Promote your organization to a North American audience while supporting efforts to protect communities and landscapes from invasive species! Email Kellie to learn more!

 

SEE OUR LIST OF SPONSORS HERE: https://pheedloop.com/northamericaninvasives2021/site/sponsors/

  


Kellie Sherman, Coordinator

Canadian Council on Invasive Species

Workdays: Monday – Friday
(249) 353-2247
coordinator@canadainvasives.ca
http://www.canadainvasives.ca

 

The Canadian Council on Invasive Species gratefully acknowledges the territories of the
Indigenous Peoples of Canada where we live and work to maintain healthy ecosystems for all.

Friday, April 23, 2021

Committee Updates

Rapid Response-Federal Agency Roles and Responsibilities:  NISC Staff have received technical comments on the draft report from USDA agencies and will compile them with reviews from other task team members. Once compiled and reviewed, NISC staff will provide a revised draft to the task team for further discussion.  

Rapid Response-Emergency Fund:  NISC Staff have received technical comments on the draft report from USDA agencies and will compile them with reviews from other task team members. Once compiled and reviewed, NISC staff will provide a revised draft to the task team for further discussion on finalizing the report for clearance.  

eDNA:  NISC staff have reached out to each member agency represented on the task team to determine their clearance process for the white paper. The process will likely include two stages: a technical peer review as required by several agencies (~6 weeks) followed by an agency policy/leadership review (~3-4 weeks). The technical paper (which serves as the basis for the white paper) has been accepted for publication by the Management of Biological Invasions journal based on responses to the peer review process.  

Wildland Fire and Invasive Species (NISC/WFLC):  Based on input from the small writing team, NISC staff have revised the goals and opportunities section of the task team report. A meeting with the task team is being scheduled to finalize that portion, which will then be distributed to the full task team for consideration. 

Information Management: NISC staff are organizing a follow-up meeting of federal experts on invasive species data and information to build on initial discussions in March. Discussion will address how to best advise the work of the USDA National Agriculture Library on invasivespeciesinfo.gov, as well as engagement with non-federal initiatives. Representation from additional federal programs is welcome. Please forward names of any interested individuals and initiatives to Kelsey Brantley. 

Crosscut Budget NISC Staff continues preparations for the annual Crosscut Budget Report. In addition to FY 2020 Actual, FY 2021 Enacted and FY 2022 President’s Budget expenditures, this year’s exercise will include invasive species-related spending from COVID-19 appropriations. Formal requests for data will be distributed after the President’s Budget is released and introductions between Principals and NISC Staff have taken place. 

Science and Technology 

Epanchin‐Niell R, et al. 2021. Public contributions to early detection of new invasive pests. Conservation Science and Practice. e422, https://doi.org/10.1111/csp2.422 
Abstract:  
Early detection of new invasive pest incursions enables faster management responses and more successful outcomes. Formal surveillance programs—such as agency‐led pest detection surveys—are thus key components of domestic biosecurity programs for managing invasive species. Independent sources of pest detection, such as members of the public and farm operators, also contribute to early detection efforts, but their roles are less understood. To assess the relative contributions of different detection sources, we compiled a novel dataset comprising reported detections of new plant pests in the US from 2010 through 2018 and analyze when, where, how, and by whom pests were first detected. While accounting for uncertainties arising from data limitations, we find that agency‐led activities detected 32–56% of new pests, independent sources detected 27–60%, and research/extension detected 8–17%. We highlight the value of independent sources in detecting high impact pests, diverse pest types, and narrowly distributed pests—with contributions comparable with agency‐led surveys. However, in the US, independent sources detect a smaller proportion of new pests than in New Zealand. We suggest opportunities to further leverage independent pest detection sources, including by citizen science, landscaping contractors, and members of the public.
  

Ricciardi A, et al. 2021. Four Priority areas to advance invasion science in the face of rapid environmental change. Environmental Reviews. https://doi.org/10.1139/er-2020-0088 
Abstract: 
 Unprecedented rates of introduction and spread of non-native species pose burgeoning challenges to biodiversity, natural resource management, regional economies, and human health. Current biosecurity efforts are failing to keep pace with globalization, revealing critical gaps in our understanding and response to invasions. Here, we identify four priority areas to advance invasion science in the face of rapid global environmental change.
Note the official Canadian Science Publishing link to the article is broken, however a preprint draft is available 
here. 

UMass Information Resource on Northeast Regional Effort on Invasive Species and Climate Change (RISCC) Management: An emerging initiative of the Northeast Climate Science Center aims to develop management-relevant research to improve invasive species management in the face of climate change.  Through working groups, information sharing and targeted research, this project addresses the information needs of invasive species managers in the context of climate change. RISCC Management is collaboratively led by the Department of Interior Northeast Climate Science Center, the New York Invasive Species Research Institute, and the University of Massachusetts to address the question “How can we manage for upcoming biological invasions in the light of climate change?”  The working group combines climate and invasive species scientists with invasive species managers and policy makers from the northeast to promote a two-way dialogue to 1) share regional knowledge about current management strategies and scientific insights; and 2) identify and address planning and information needs of managers related to invasive species and climate change. 

Webinars 

SAVE THE DATE: Pacific Regional Invasive Species and Climate Change Management Webinar: Thursday, May 6, 2021 at 2-3:30 PM HST. The webinar will feature the Pacific Drought Knowledge Exchange Project with speakers Ryan Longman (East-West Center) and Sierra McDaniel (Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park). Information on registration coming soon. 

Meeting and Conference Calendar 

(NOTE:  Events may be held virtually, rescheduled or cancelled due to COVID-19.) 

MAY 2021 

Society for the Study of Marine Bioinvasions (SSMB) International Conference XI:  Annapolis, MD, May 10-14, 2022 (in-person). Hosted by the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center’s Marine Invasions Lab. Information on meeting themes, guest speakers, special events, student travel funds, and local attractions will be posted on our website over the coming months at www.marinebioinvasions.info 

2021 North American Invasive Species Forum:  May 18-20, 2021 (virtual). The North American Invasive Species Forum is an international event encompassing the interests of professionals and organizations involved in invasive species management, research, and regulation across North America. The Forum will bring together the international invasive species community and will highlight new research, emerging issues, success stories and prevention and response initiatives from across Canada, Mexico and the U.S., and also build on the previous North American Invasive Species Forum held in 2017. The Canadian Council on Invasive Species is hosting this Forum with the support of, and guidance from, an international steering committee representing the U.S., Canada, and Mexico.  

Register:  https://pheedloop.com/northamericaninvasives2021/site/home/  

Invasive Species Wikipedia Edit-A-Thon:  May 20, 2021 (virtual)Learn to edit Wikipedia and help improve articles about invasive species. The event will begin with an introduction and information about the Information Center and invasive species from Joyce Bolton, head of the National Invasive Species Information Center, and other guest speakers from USDA. Jamie Flood, Wikipedian-in-residence of National Agricultural Library and Ariel Cetrone of Wikimedia D.C. will lead a one-hour training on Wikipedia editing. The rest of the day will be spent updating invasive species articles on Wikipedia. During the event, experienced editors and Invasive Species experts will be on hand to assist and answer questions. 

Register:  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/invasive-species-wikipedia-edit-a-thon-tickets-151983457613 

 JUNE 2021 

Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force (ANSTF) Meeting:  June 28-30, 2021 (virtual). The meeting will be held in the afternoon each day (ET). Details forthcoming. 

SEPTEMBER 2021 

NAISMA Annual Conference:  September 27-30, 2021 (virtual and in-person). This year’s conference will focus on transboundary cooperation. The agenda to be released May 2021.  

Registration:  https://naisma.org/conferences/?mc_cid=fdac7b0b79&mc_eid=e7645bd6dc 

OCTOBER 2021 

California Invasive Plant Council (Cal-IPC) Symposium:  October 26-29, 2021 (virtual). Call for abstracts is now open for this year’s symposium, “Expanding Community to Protect Biodiversity”, celebrates Cal-IPC's 30-year anniversary. Deadline for abstracts is July 15. 2021.  

Registration (opens in May): https://www.cal-ipc.org/resources/symposium/ 

NOVEMBER 2021 

Alaska Invasive Species Workshop:  November 3-4, 2021; Anchorage, AK (in-person and online). Sponsored by the Alaska Invasive Species Partnership. More information on registration and submitting abstracts will be provided in the coming weeks at https://uaf.edu/ces/invasives/akisp/ 

DECEMBER 2021 

Western Weed Coordinating Committee (WWCC) Annual Meeting:  December 7-9, 2021; Denver, CO (in-person w/virtual option). Agenda is currently in development. More details will be provided on the WWCC website as the meeting date approaches.   

MAY 2022  

Society for the Study of Marine Bioinvasions (SSMB) International Conference XI:  Annapolis, MD, May 10-14, 2022. Hosted by the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center’s Marine Invasions Lab. Information on meeting themes, guest speakers, special events, student travel funds, and local attractions will be posted on our website over the coming months at www.marinebioinvasions.info. 


Thursday, April 22, 2021 (Earth Day)

NPS IPM Webinar Series

James Howard, NPS, will present Session #13 of NPS' Integrated Pest Management Webinar Series, on the 2021 Enhancements to the NPS PUPS database on Tuesday, April 27th at 12:00pm MT. Additionally, the final session for the month, Session #17, will be on Pesticide Storage, Container Management, and PPE as presented by Kenneth Morin, the CASHE (Compliance Assessment - Safety, Health, and the Environment) program lead with the Bureau of Land Management! And don't forget about the upcoming Session #16 on Hazard Communication by Joe Jacobs, Regional Safety Manager in NPS/Interior Region 2!

Listed below are the themes for the upcoming months:
May: the 11-step IPM Process
June: Pest Specifics

A public facing website on the NPS Common Learning Portal with links to register for the trainings is located here (https://mylearning.nps.gov/training-courses/integrated-pest-management-virtual-training-series/).


Tuesday, April 20th, 2021

Four Priority areas to advance invasion science in the face of rapid environmental change

Link to pdf article:  https://cdnsciencepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1139/er-2020-0088

Authors: Anthony Ricciardi, Josephine C. Iacarella, David C. Aldridge, Tim M. Blackburn, James T. Carlton, Jane A. Catford, Jaimie T.A. Dick, Philip E. Hulme, Jonathan M. Jeschke, Andrew M. Liebhold,
Julie L. Lockwood, Hugh J. MacIsaac, Laura A. Meyerson, Petr Pyšek, David M. Richardson, Gregory M. Ruiz, Daniel Simberloff, Montserrat Vilà, and David A. Wardle

Unprecedented rates of introduction and spread of non-native species pose burgeoning challenges to biodiversity, natural resource management, regional economies, and human health. Current biosecurity efforts are failing to keep pace with globalization, revealing critical gaps in our understanding and response to invasions. Here, we identify four priority areas to advance invasion science in the face of rapid global environmental change.

Friday, April 16th, 2021

https://www.northcountrypublicradio.org/news/story/43550/20210409/do-nothing-about-invasive-plants

Yes, there really is an invasive plant that is better left alone: Garlic mustard. For details, click the link here above to read the article featuring a study by Cornell University's Berndt Blossey.

Friday, April 16th, 2021

#NAISF2021

 

The North American Invasive Species Forum is an international event encompassing the interests of professionals and organizations involved in invasive species management, research, and regulation across North America.

The Forum will bring together the international invasive species community and will highlight new research, emerging issues, success stories and prevention and response initiatives from across Canada, Mexico and the U.S.. The forum will also build on the previous North American Invasive Species Forum held in 2017.

The Canadian Council on Invasive Species is hosting this Forum with the support of, and guidance from, an international steering committee representing the U.S., Canada, and Mexico.

 

VISIT: 2021 North American Invasive Species Forum - May 18, 2021

 

We are very excited to present a wide variety of speakers, sessions and topics for the 2021 North American Invasive Species Forum! Above are just a few of our speakers from across North America, discussing a wide variety of topics including but not limited to:

  • Strawberry Blossom Weevil, Anthonomus rubi (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is established in British Columbia, Canada,  Michelle Franklin
  • Human-caused Climate Change, Vegetation, and invasive species, Patrick Gonzalez
  • Mexico's Progress and Commitment to Comprehensive Island Restoration, Federico Mendez
  • E-commerce: Plant Health Implications and the Importance of Collaboration, Cory Marker and Bruno Gallant

Other sessions and topics:

  • Networking opportunities
  • Horizon Scanning and Bio surveillance
  • Three concurrent sessions focused on aquatic, terrestrial and insects and animals
  • Keynotes from Australia, New Zealand and the US

VISIT: 2021 North American Invasive Species Forum - May 18, 2021

 

Register Now - Early Bird Registration Ends April 23rd!


We also have funding to support FREE indigenous and tribal attendance as well as a new youth ticket for only $10 (30 and under!) Details are as follows:

  • CCIS Member Price (full forum - 3 days): $140 (until April 23rd)
  • CCIS Non-Member Price (full forum - 3 days): $170 (until April 23rd)
  • CCIS Member/Non-Member (one day only): $55 (until April 23rd)
  • Indigenous/tribal bursary (full forum): FREE! Limited quantities available!
  • Youth (under 30): ONLY $10! Limited quantities available!

PLEASE NOTE: Registration for all tickets will end May 17th at 12 noon.

 

WE ARE STILL ACCEPTING SPONSORS!


Sponsors will benefit from premium visibility among guests of the Forum. Your organization will be profiled in a variety of ways, depending on the level you choose. We have Gold, Silver and Bronze opportunities available and can work with you to suit your needs. Promote your organization to a North American audience while supporting efforts to protect communities and landscapes from invasive species! Email Kellie at coordinator@canadainvasives.ca to learn more!

  

Kellie Sherman

Coordinator

Canadian Council on Invasive Species

 

Workdays: Monday – Friday
  (249) 353-2247
  coordinator@canadainvasives.ca
  http://www.canadainvasives.ca

 

The Canadian Council on Invasive Species gratefully acknowledges the territories of the
Indigenous Peoples of Canada where we live and work to maintain healthy ecosystems for all.

Thursday, April 15th

The National Invasive Species Awareness Week (NISAW) takes place during two separate weeks each year.

NISAW Part II is coming up soon with even more focus on state and local issues of significance. Partners are planning local events to remove invasive species. These events are meant to educate elected officials, decision makers, and the public on how they can help to stop the spread of invasive species and protect communities.

Coming soon! We'll have a map where you can add your local NISAW event.

There will be more webinars from May 17-21, 2021. Get registered below!

→ VISIT NISAW.ORG

What is NISAW?

National Invasive Species Awareness Week (NISAW) is an international event to raise awareness about invasive species, the threat that they pose, and what can be done to prevent their spread. Representatives from local, state, federal, and regional organizations gather to discuss legislation, policies, and improvements that can be made to prevent and manage invasive species.
NISAW Part I focused on national and regional issues of importance. NAISMA held a series of virtual webinars Feb. 22-26 that reached more than 1,650 people. 

→ LEARN MORE ABOUT NISAW PART I

NISAW Part II Agenda:


→ GET THE TOOLKIT    This free digital toolkit provides fact sheets, articles, PSA templates, social media posts and more. Use these resources to spread the word and promote your local NISAW events.


NISAW would not be possible without the support from its sponsors:

March 31, 2021

NISC News 

NISC Senior Advisers Meeting: The Senior Advisers met via teleconference on March 25, 2021

NISC Co-Chair Senior Advisers Meeting:  The NISC Co-Chair Seniors Advisers meeting on March 9, 2021 via teleconference and discussed overall progress on the NISC FY2021 Work Plan and operations. A follow-up meeting will be held to address more strategic considerations moving forward. 

Rapid Response-Federal Agency Roles and Responsibilities:  NISC Staff are awaiting agency comments before developing a revised draft. The task team will then consider next steps to finalize the document will be scheduled once all comments are received.  

Rapid Response-Emergency Fund:  NISC Staff are awaiting agency comments before developing a revised draft. The task team will then consider next steps to finalize and clear the document will be scheduled once all comments are received.  

eDNA:  The task team met on Monday March 22, 2021 and discussed edits from the small writing group on the white paper. NISC staff are currently soliciting comments for a final draft and will work with each member agency on the task team to determine their clearance process. For the technical paper, Jeff Morisette has developed an initial response to the peer review comments and is working with a small group to address those. Aiming to resubmit to the journal next week.  

Wildland Fire and Invasive Species (NISC/WFLC):  The goals and opportunities section of the task team report has been revised for comment by the small writing group. It will then be circulated to the full task team. NISC staff is working with WFLC to draft a short update memo to NISC and WFLC co-chairs to introduce them to the partnership and give them a status update. This will likely be sent prior to the next WFLC meeting on April 8, 2021, which will include this as a brief item on the agenda. 

Information Management: NISC staff met with a small group of federal program experts on invasive species data and information on March 18, 2021, to review programs and brainstorm possible opportunities for collaboration. Discussion focused mainly on qualitative information needs and resources, the potential role of USDA National Agricultural Library's www.invasivespeciesinfo.gov, and capacity constraints. The group discussed the need to include representation from additional federal programs to its next meeting. Please forward names of any interested individuals and initiatives to Kelsey Brantley. 

Crosscut Budget:  NISC Staff is preparing for development of the annual Crosscut Budget Report, which will include FY 2020 Actual Expenditures, b) FY 2021 Enacted Budget; and c) FY 2022 President’s Budget, for which passback occurred last week. Formal requests for data will be distributed after the President’s Budget is released and introductions between Principals and NISC Staff have taken place. 

 

Emerging/Ongoing Issues and News Items 

Invasive zebra mussels found in aquarium moss products (some in Kalamazoo) prompt national response (Second Wave Media): 

https://www.secondwavemedia.com/southwest-michigan/features/Invasive-zebra-mussels-found-in-aquarium-moss-products-some-in-Kalamazoo-prompt-nationa-031521.aspx 

The creature that took control of the Great Lakes (Interlochen Public Radio):  https://www.interlochenpublicradio.org/post/creature-took-control-great-lakes 

 

Policy and Law 

NAISMA Letter to Appropriations Committees:  The North American Invasive Species Management Association (NAISMA) has sent a letter to House and Senate Appropriations Committee leadership. The letter provides invasive species-related funding recommendations for consideration during development of their respective FY 2022 appropriations bills (PDF attached).  

Water Resources Development Act of 2020 Comment Period: The USACE will utilize these comments and the existing language to develop implementation guidance for the specific provisions to the bill and move forward with carrying out the specific work based on this guidance. https://www.usace.army.mil/Missions/Civil-Works/Project-Planning/Legislative-Links/wrda_2020/ 

Delaware Invasive Plants Law: This Act prohibits the import, export, sale, transport, distribution, or propagation of any plant identified by the Secretary of the (Delaware) Department of Agriculture, with the advice of the Delaware Native Species Commission, as an invasive plant. This Act also requires that plants identified as potentially invasive be sold with a tag that identifies the plant as potentially invasive. A violation of this Act may result in a civil penalty of $50 to $500, but only after the person has had the opportunity for an administrative hearing and the opportunity to come into compliance with this Act. This Act takes effect July 1, 2022. 

Florida Approves Ban on Invasive Reptiles :  The Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission (FFWC) recently approved rule changes that ban possession and breeding of 16 invasive reptile species.  

FWC News Release:  https://myfwc.com/news/all-news/invasive-comm-221/  

Related Washington Post Article (subscription required) https://www.washingtonpost.com/climate-environment/a-reptilian-nightmare-florida-bans-nonnative-species-despite-industry-outcry/2021/03/19/bdc0db4a-8769-11eb-bfdf-4d36dab83a6d_story.html 

 

Science and Technology 

2019 State of the Great Lakes (SOGL) Technical Report:  Released by EPA (Page 421 - Invasive Species Section.)  Two sub-indicators:  1) Rate of Introduction and 2) Impact of Invasion.  

NOTE: Impact uses a new indicator GLANSIS developed - this is the 1st report in which that appears. https://binational.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/SOGL-19-Technical-Reports-compiled-2021_02_10.pdf 

Seaplane Invasive Species Risk Analysis Notice of Funding Opportunity:  The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, co-chair of the ANS Task Force, requests proposals to build upon previous studies and evaluate the risk of the seaplane pathway as a vector for AIS. This risk analysis should include two components: a risk assessment and identification of risk management actions. The risk assessment is needed to identify and quantify the range of waterbodies that are utilized by seaplanes and what AIS may be transported through this pathway. This information will be used to identify risk management actions that can be taken by seaplane operators, manufacturers, and others to reduce the spread of AIS.  The assessment should be conducted for the 48 contiguous states and Alaska. Applications should be submitted through Grant Solutions, as described in the notice. Additional application information is included in the "related documents" tab with the announcement in Grants.gov.  Closing date:  June 4, 2021. 

Link:  https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html?keywords=F21AS00406 

Gippet, Jérôme MW, Bertelsmeier, C. 2021. Invasiveness is linked to greater success in the global pet trade. PNAS 118 (14) e2016337118,  https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2016337118:  The global pet trade may accelerate the spread of invasive species around the world, which threatens native biodiversity and impacts human economy and health. Here, using an extensive metaanalysis, we show that invasive species are strongly overrepresented across mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fish traded as pets. Even in the emergent trade of ants as pets, which is too recent to be responsible for any invasions yet, we found an overrepresentation of invasive species. This indicates that the pet trade not only creates opportunities for invasions, but that it favors specifically invasive species. These findings call for the rapid implementation of strict international regulations of the trade in animals as pets. (Purchase required; see also https://phys.org/news/2021-03-link-invasive-species-commercial-success.html.) 

Grosholz E, et al. 2021. Stage-specific overcompensation, the hydra effect, and the failure to eradicate an invasive predator. PNAS. 118:12, e2003955118; https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2003955118As biological invasions continue to increase globally, eradication programs have been undertaken at significant cost, often without consideration of relevant ecological theory. Theoretical fisheries models have shown that harvest can actually increase the equilibrium size of a population, and uncontrolled studies and anecdotal reports have documented population increases in response to invasive species removal (akin to fisheries harvest). Both findings may be driven by high levels of juvenile survival associated with low adult abundance, often referred to as overcompensation. Here we show that in a coastal marine ecosystem, an eradication program resulted in stage-specific overcompensation and a 30-fold, single-year increase in the population of an introduced predator. Data collected concurrently from four adjacent regional bays without eradication efforts showed no similar population increase, indicating a local and not a regional increase. Specifically, the eradication program had inadvertently reduced the control of recruitment by adults via cannibalism, thereby facilitating the population explosion. Mesocosm experiments confirmed that adult cannibalism of recruits was size-dependent and could control recruitment. Genomic data show substantial isolation of this population and implicate internal population dynamics for the increase, rather than recruitment from other locations. More broadly, this controlled experimental demonstration of stage-specific overcompensation in an aquatic system provides an important cautionary message for eradication efforts of species with limited connectivity and similar life histories. 

Montoya JM, Lurgi M. 2021. Warming indirectly increases invasion success in food webs. Proceedings of the Royal Society B. 288:1947, https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2020.2622: Climate warming and biological invasions are key drivers of biodiversity change. Their combined effects on ecological communities remain largely unexplored. We investigated the direct and indirect influences of temperature on invasion success, and their synergistic effects on community structure and dynamics. Using size-structured food web models, we found that higher temperatures increased invasion success. The direct physiological effects of temperature on invasions were minimal in comparison with indirect effects mediated by changes on food web structure and stability. Warmer communities with less connectivity, shortened food chains and reduced temporal variability were more susceptible to invasions. The directionality and magnitude of invasions effects on food webs varied across temperature regimes. When invaded, warmer communities became smaller, more connected and with more predator species than their colder counterparts. They were also less stable and their species more abundant. Considering food web structure is crucial to predict invasion success and its impacts along temperature gradients. 

Remington TE et al. 2021. Sagebrush conservation strategy: challenges to sagebrush conservation, U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2020–1125, 327 https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20201125:  The sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) biome, its wildlife, and the services and benefits it provides people and local communities are at risk. Development in the sagebrush biome, for many purposes, has resulted in multiple and often cumulative negative impacts. These impacts, ranging from simple habitat loss to complex, interactive changes in ecosystem function, continue to accelerate even as the need grows for the resources provided by this biome. This “Sagebrush Conservation Strategy—Challenges to Sagebrush Conservation,” is an overview and assessment of the challenges facing land managers and landowners in conserving sagebrush ecosystems. This strategy is intended to provide guidance so that the unparalleled collaborative efforts to conserve the iconic greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) by State and Federal agencies, Tribes, academia, nongovernmental organizations, and stakeholders can be expanded to the entire sagebrush biome to benefit the people and wildlife that depend on this ecosystem. This report is organized into 3 parts: I. Importance of the Sagebrush Biome to People and Wildlife; II. Change Agents in the Sagebrush Biome—Extent, Impacts, and Effort to Address Them; and III. Current Conservation Paradigm and Other Conservation Needs for Sagebrush. 

Springborn MR, et al. 2020. Amphibian collapses exacerbated malaria outbreaks in Central America. Pre-Print. DOI:10.1101/2020.12.07.20245613: Ecosystems play an important role in supporting human welfare, including regulating the transmission of infectious diseases. Many of these services are not fully-appreciated due to complex environmental dynamics and lack of baseline data. Multicontinental amphibian decline due to the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) provides a stark example. Even though amphibians are known to affect natural food webs—including mosquitoes that transmit human diseases—the human health impacts connected to their massive decline have received little attention. Here we show a causal link between a wave of Bd-driven collapse of amphibians in Central America and increased human malaria incidence. At the canton-level in Costa Rica and district-level in Panama, expected malaria incidence increased for eight years subsequent to amphibian losses, peaking at an additional 1.0 cases per 1,000 population (CPK). The increase is substantial in comparison to annual incidence levels from outbreaks in these countries, which peaked at 1.1-1.5 CPK during our period of study from 1976-2016. This pattern holds across multiple alternative approaches to the estimation model. This previously unidentified impact of biodiversity loss illustrates the often hidden human welfare costs of conservation failures. These findings also show the importance of mitigating international trade-driven spread of similar emergent pathogens like Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans . Significance Statement Despite substantial multicontinental collapses in amphibian populations from spread of the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), the implications for humans have not been systematically studied. Amphibians are known to affect food webs, including mosquitoes that serve as a vector for the spread of disease. However, little is known about how their loss erodes ecosystem services, including the regulation of the transmission of infectious diseases. Using Central America as a case study, this study shows that Bd-driven amphibian loss led to a substantial increase in malaria incidence. The results highlight the often underappreciated social costs of biodiversity loss, including the potential stakes of ecosystem disruption from failing to stop spread of future novel pathogens. 

Sturtevant et al. A Review and Secondary Analysis of Competition-Related Impacts of Nonindigenous Aquatic Plants in the Laurentian Great Lakes. Plants. https://www.mdpi.com/2223-7747/10/2/406: The Laurentian Great Lakes of North America are home to thousands of native fishes, invertebrates, plants, and other species that not only provide recreational and economic value to the region but also hold an important ecological value. However, there are also 55 nonindigenous species of aquatic plants that may be competing with native species and affecting this value. Here, we use a key regional database—the Great Lakes Aquatic Nonindigenous Species Information System (GLANSIS)—to describe the introduction of nonindigenous aquatic plants in the Great Lakes region and to examine patterns relating to their capacity to compete with native plants species. Specifically, we used an existing catalog of environmental impact assessments to qualitatively evaluate the potential for each nonindigenous plant species to outcompete native plant species for available resources. Despite an invasion record spanning nearly two centuries (1837–2020), a great deal remains unknown about the impact of competition by these species. Nonetheless, our synthesis of existing documentation reveals that many of these nonindigenous species have notable impacts on the native plant communities of the region in general and on species of concern in particular. Furthermore, we provide a thorough summary of the diverse adaptations that may contribute to giving these nonindigenous plants a competitive advantage. Adaptations that have been previously found to aid successful invasions were common in 98% of the nonindigenous aquatic plant species in the database. 

Risk Assessment Survey: Researchers at the University of Florida are looking for managers, analysts, and researchers who have experience with using Risk Assessments for invasive species to complete a short survey. They are interested in which tools are commonly used, and users experience with data quality, data gathering techniques, and implementation of assessments. The goal is to learn about what currently works well and what can be improved. This survey is anonymous, but results will be published in peer-reviewed literature. The survey is available at https://ufl.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_5yTXJc3v1hZgHOZ. Questions can be refered to please feel free to Deah Lieurance at Dmlieurance@UFL.edu 

 

NISC  and Other Webinars 

NISC Advanced Biotechnology Community of Practice Webinar Series:  Recordings of NISC-hosted webinars listed below are available to Senior Advisers upon request:  

  • Advanced Biotechnology CoP  
    • Applications for Invasive Species Control - April 1, 2020 
    • Risk Assessment - June 3, 2020 
    • Policy and Law - August 5, 2020 
    • Public Engagement and Social Issues - October 7, 2020 
    • DOI Prize Challenge Winners - February 3, 2021 
  • Asian Giant Hornet Update – June 3, 2020  

 

Meeting and Conference Calendar 

(NOTE:  Events may be held virtually, rescheduled or cancelled due to COVID-19.) 

MARCH - APRIL 2021 

NAISMA EDDMapS Summit:  March 31 and April 1, 2021 (virtual). This first EDDMapS Summit will be focused on training and partnerships. Each day will kick off with big-picture keynotes by Mike Ielmini, National Invasive Species Program Manager for the USDA Forest Service and Steve Manning, President of Invasive Plant Control, Inc. Day 1 will focus on in-depth training on how to use the EDDMapS apps, website, data import and export tools. Day 2 will feature panel discussions from experts from across the U.S. and Canada on public engagement; using data for funding and decision making; treatment tracking and monitoring; and using data for modeling. This is a free event and is open to everyone. 

Event Registration, session overviews and agendashttps://naisma.org/eddmaps-summit-2021/?mc_cid=c6594f34ea&mc_eid=e848319920  

MAY 2021 

Society for the Study of Marine Bioinvasions (SSMB) International Conference XI:  Annapolis, MD, May 10-14, 2022. Hosted by the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center’s Marine Invasions Lab. Information on meeting themes, guest speakers, special events, student travel funds, and local attractions will be posted on our website over the coming months at www.marinebioinvasions.info 

2021 North American Invasive Species Forum:  May 18-20, 2021 (virtual). The North American Invasive Species Forum is an international event encompassing the interests of professionals and organizations involved in invasive species management, research, and regulation across North America. The Forum will bring together the international invasive species community and will highlight new research, emerging issues, success stories and prevention and response initiatives from across Canada, Mexico and the U.S., and also build on the previous North American Invasive Species Forum held in 2017. The Canadian Council on Invasive Species is hosting this Forum with the support of, and guidance from, an international steering committee representing the U.S., Canada, and Mexico.  

Registration:  https://pheedloop.com/northamericaninvasives2021/site/home/  

JUNE 2021  

Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force (ANSTF) Meeting:  June 28-30, 2021 (virtual). The meeting will be held in the afternoon each day (ET). Details forthcoming. 

SEPTEMBER 2021 

NAISMA Annual Conference:  September 27-30, 2021 (virtual and in-person). This year’s conference will focus on transboundary cooperation. The agenda to be released May 2021.  

Registration:  https://naisma.org/conferences/?mc_cid=fdac7b0b79&mc_eid=e7645bd6dc 

MAY 2022 

Society for the Study of Marine Bioinvasions (SSMB) International Conference XI:  Annapolis, MD, May 10-14, 2022. Hosted by the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center’s Marine Invasions Lab. Information on meeting themes, guest speakers, special events, student travel funds, and local attractions will be posted on our website over the coming months at www.marinebioinvasions.info. 

March 5, 2021

See the announcements for the Ecologist position(s) with the National Park Service-Denver Service Center’s (DSC) Revegetation Program (links below).  The positions are in the 0408 Ecologist series and will be filled at the GS12 level.  The Revegetation Program at the DSC is in the Transportation Division and as such many projects focus on transportation related revegetation work.  The program also works with the DSC Design and Construction Division and assists with revegetation associated with many different types of ground disturbing activities.  We also work to support parks directly for various restoration, plant material, and revegetation needs.

Open: 03/05/2021

Closes: 03/26/2021 or until 100 applicant count reached for each vacancy

DE: Open to the public.

https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/594256600

MP: Open to status candidates, Land Management eligibles, VEOA eligibles, Career Transition eligibles, and those eligible for special/noncompetitive hiring authorities including Public Land Corps.

https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/594256800

March 5, 2021 CORRECTED DATE AND TIME!!!

Following the recent release of the Great Lakes Phragmites Collaborative’s Common Agenda (see below), you are cordially invited to attend a briefing on the Collaborative and opportunities for future engagement. The briefing is scheduled for Wednesday, March 17 at 10:30 a.m. Eastern.

Registration information for this briefing can be found at https://www.greatlakesphragmites.net/resources/webinars/

The briefing will be scheduled for 60 minutes and will include a presentation on the recent work of the Great Lakes Phragmites Collaborative and activities relevant to your agency. There will also be ample time for questions and discussion.

The Phragmites Adaptive Management Framework Strategic Plan can also be seen below.

March 4, 2021

The NPS Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program, in collaboration with the NPS invasive species programs, is embarking on an ambitious project to host weekly webinars in Calendar Year 2021. The presenters currently slated include NPS and other DOI agency employees, DOI contractors, USDA/USFS employees, and university professors. They will be presenting on topics such as Invasive Species, Pesticide Safety, Pesticide Use Proposal System (PUPS), and Museum Management. The webinar series is open to all DOI employees and partners.

To register and see the list of trainings:  Integrated Pest Management Virtual Training Series - NPS: Common Learning Portal


Integrated Pest Management Virtual Training Series - NPS: Common Learning Portal

The NPS Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program, in collaboration with the NPS invasive species programs, is embarking on an ambitious project to host weekly webinars in Calendar Year 2021. The presenters currently slated include NPS and other DOI agency employees, DOI contractors, USDA/USFS employees, and university professors. They will be presenting on topics such as

mylearning.nps.gov

March – Forest Health Pests

The March IPM webinar series focuses on forest health pests and protection, plus a bonus webinar on the 2021 Enhancements to the NPS Pesticide Use Proposal System (PUPS), from Jamie Howard, the NPS IPM Physical Scientist and PUPS Database Administrator!

The Register Now link will take you to the site to sign up for any or all of this month’s webinars.

Session #9: Forest Health Tools: Surveying and Reporting on Forest Health Conditions in Parks and other Forested Landscapes
Pre-recorded video – 57 minutes
Presenter: Bill Monahan, United States Forest Service

Session #10: Regenerating after Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) Mortality Using a Climate Adaptive Framework
March 10th, 12:00pm – 1:30pm MT
Presenter: Marcella Windmuller-Campione, University of Minnesota

Session #11: Perception and Management of Black Ash for EAB
March 17th, 12:00pm – 1:30pm MT
Presenters: Marcella Windmuller-Campione & Ingrid Schneider, University of Minnesota

Session #12: Overview of NPS Forest Health Protection Program (FHP)
March 23rd, 1:30pm – 3:00pm MT
Presenters: Lori Makarick, NPS Landscape Restoration & Adaptation Branch Chief & Jamie Howard, NPS PUPS Database Administrator

Session #13: 2021 Pesticide Use Proposal System (PUPS) Enhancements
March 31st, 11:30am – 1:00pm MT
Presenter: Jamie Howard, NPS PUPS Database Administrator

Upcoming Topics

  • April – Pesticide Safety
  • May – 11-step IPM Process
  • June – Pest Specifics
March 4th, 2021


This is an invitation from Guest Editor Dr. Ioannis Bazos (of the National & Kapodistrian University of Athens) to contribute articles to a special issue of the journal Plants (ISSN 2223-7747; CODEN: PLANCD) on the subject of "Invasive Alien Species in Protected Areas." If your manuscript is selected, special discounts rates are available to appear in this open access peer-reviewed journal that is published by MDPI.

For further information about this special issue and how to submit your manuscript, please see:
https://www.mdpi.com/journal/plants/special_issues/invasive_alien_species_protected_areas

For information on manuscript preparation and related matters, please see the instructions for authors:
https://www.mdpi.com/journal/plants/instructions

Although the deadline for submission of manuscripts to this special issue is not until 31 December 2021, the guest editors would appreciate hearing from you in the next few weeks as to whether you are interested in submitting a paper (in order to help with the planning).

This open access journal covers all key areas of plant science and is supported by an outstanding Editorial Board composed of high-profile researchers. For more information on the Plants editorial board, see:
https://www.mdpi.com/journal/plants/editors


March 2, 2021

March 31 - April 01, 2021

The University of Georgia - Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health in collaboration with its partner organizations is hosting the EDDMapS Summit 2021, a comprehensive two-day training and partner discussion around EDDMapS (Early Detection and Distribution Mapping System). Hosted by the North American Invasive Species Management Association, this free summit is open to everyone from beginners to experienced users.  

Learn more here or register below.

Day 1, March 31, 2021

11:00 am - 3:00 pm EST (9:00 am - 1:00 pm MST)

What to expect:

  • Presentations that cover EDDMapS’ smartphone apps, website, tools, and projects
  • Features on the new EDDMapS app as well as the updates to the EDDMapS Pro platforms
  • Instructions on how to contribute bulk data, download existing data and integrate the data into your websites and programs



Day 2, April 1, 2021

11:00 am - 3:00 pm EST (9:00 am - 1:00 pm MST)

What to expect:

  • Four panel discussions featuring experts from across the U.S. and Canada
  • Topics include: public engagement; using data for funding and decision making; treatment tracking and monitoring; and using data for modeling
  • Panels will include short introductory presentations and open discussion



What is EDDMapS?

EDDMapS (Early Detection and Distribution Mapping System) is a web-based mapping system for documenting invasive species and pest distribution. It is fast, easy to use, and doesn't require Geographic Information Systems experience. Launched in 2005 by the Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health at the University of Georgia, it was originally designed as a tool for state Exotic Pest Plant Councils to develop more complete distribution data of invasive species. Since then, the program has expanded to include the entire U.S. and Canada, and expanded to document biological control agents and certain native pest species.

EDDMapS' goal is to maximize the effectiveness and accessibility of the immense numbers of invasive species and pest observations recorded each year. As of February 2021, EDDMapS has over 5.1 million records.

March 1, 2021

New report online!
Best Management Practices Manual for Non-Chemical Weed Control

This manual, available as a free download, provides comprehensive descriptions of 21 non-chemical weed control techniques used in California. It also provides descriptions of biological control agents targeting 18 of California's most challenging weeds.

Compiled by researchers and practitioners, the manual includes tips on how to use techniques, the kinds of plants and environments in which they work best, and the associated risks.

These Best Management Practices (BMPs) form the foundation for an online decision support tool being developed in partnership with the University of California Agriculture & Natural Resources, with funding from the California Department of Pesticide Regulation.

The report can be downloaded as a free pdf document from this web page: https://www.cal-ipc.org/resources/library/publications/non-chem/

Cover of the BMP manual for Non-Chemical Weed Control with 9 images of various methods, including fire, grazing, hand pulling, biocontrol, and cutting.