Using Building Permits to Monitor Disaster Recovery: a Spatio-Temporal Case Study of Coastal Mississippi Following Hurricane Katrina

Introduction

Places suffering from impacts from the same event have considerably different rates of recovery. Studies often lack spatial and temporal resolution to understand this difference in recovery process and patterns. This paper looks at building permits as a spatial scan to identify spatial and temporal dimensions of recovery in coastal Mississippi following Hurrican Katrina. Significant space-time clusters of recovery activity are identified which indicates that the amount of damage and the amount of pre-event housing are a strong influence on timing and location of building permit clusters. This method is used to evaluate public data to better understand long-term recovery processes.

Related Methods

Case study research is used to conduct an in-depth investigation of an issue at a specific instance and location.
Use of data that was collected by individuals other than the investigator. This includes newspapers, census data, maps, etc. Secondary data analysis is often a starting point for other social science research methods.

Books and Publications

  • Joanne R. Stevenson, Christopher T. Emrich, Jerry T. Mitchell & Susan L. Cutter (2010) Using Building Permits to Monitor Disaster Recovery: A Spatio-Temporal Case Study of Coastal Mississippi Following Hurricane Katrina, Cartography and Geographic Information Science, 37:1, 57-68, DOI: 10.1559/152304010790588052