Human Dimensions Training Resources

Link to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Human Dimensions Resource Portal

 

Check out this video to learn more about all the FWS HD Resource Portal has to offer as well as a tutorial on how to navigate the site!

This podcast announces the launch of the FWS HD Resource Portal and outlines the sites features!

 

Trainings

Podcasts 

Recorded Broadcasts, Webinars and Podcasts (by topic)

Other Human Dimensions Resources

 


Trainings

Onsite Trainings

Negotiation Skills for Natural Resource Professionals: Building a Foundation 

  • Register here
  • Offered through U.S. Geological Survey
  • At this course, participants will:
    • Become well-versed in different types of negotiations, negotiation styles, and strategies;
    • Understand how to best communicate interests and objectives;
    • Learn to successfully analyze and assess the knowledge and interests of the other parties.

Strategies and Tactics for the Experienced Natural Resource Negotiator 

  • Offered through U.S. Geological Survey
  • At this course, participants will:
    • Diagnose natural resource negotiations
    • Plan multi-party, long-term negotiations
    • Select, assemble, and lead an effective negotiation team
    • Obtain and apply technical information in a negotiation process

Communicating Science – Distilling Your Message 

  • Offered through National Conservation Training Center
  • This training is only available to Fish and Wildlife Service staff
  • The course goal is to help participants learn to communicate more effectively about science with people outside their field, including the general public, policy makers, the media, or funders and prospective collaborators in other disciplines. Through discussion and practice, the course will first focus on fundamental skills - knowing your audience, connecting with your audience, and speaking clearly and conversationally about your work and why it matters. Then students will work on applying these skills productively in challenging settings.

Human Dimensions Foundations of Natural Resource Conservation (CLM8226) 

  • Annual (Fall)
  • Offered through National Conservation Training Center
  • This course will foster a common understanding and application of human dimensions of natural resource conservation. It will provide an overview of key concepts, methods, and practical applications; historical context and 'must have' tools for the natural resource professional's toolbox. The course is based on a human dimensions framework and relies heavily on case study applications, including experiences of the participants, to demonstrate the benefits of addressing the human dimensions of conservation challenges.

National FWS Communications, Outreach and Visitor Services Workshop

  • Annual
  • Offered through National Conservation Training Center
  • This 3-day Communications, Outreach and Visitor Services (COVS) Workshop will include plenary sessions in the morning and breakout sessions in the afternoon as well as a poster session. Sessions will address current topics and trends as identified by the COVS community.
  • Tuition is prepaid for FWS, NPS, and BLM. However, the cancellation policy still applies.
  • By the end of the workshop, participants will
    • be able to more effectively reach out and communicate with a diversity of audiences regarding the USFWS and conservation of natural resources, using current best practices and state of the art tools and techniques.
    • be a part of the growing community of USFWS professionals engaged through shared learning and networking on the latest communication, outreach and visitor services practices.  

 

Online Trainings

Partnership and Community Collaboration: Managing by Network 

  • Managing by Network is designed for federal managers, specialists or front-line supervisors involved in partnership and community collaboration. Curriculum centers on the 22 partnership and community collaboration competencies defined by OPM.
  • Learn how to strengthen formal and informal partnerships and foster community stakeholder engagement. Acquire knowledge and build skills with your interagency peers. Participants learn the principles and practices of Managing by Network through interactive online training. This course includes 17 webinars hosted from January to June. Application opens in October. Sign up to receive the course announcement at www.partnership-academy.net.

Environmental Communication: Research Into Practice

  • 10-week session
  • Offered through the International Environmental Communication Association
  • The course explores how the most relevant research and theory from communication, psychology, sociology, and political science can be used to improve the practice of science, sustainability and environmental communication. Participants will get an overview of the field and how language, images, narratives, values, frames and media come together in advocacy and social marketing campaigns, and other forms of public participation for environmental protection.
  • The course is relevant to environmental communication professionals, environmental policy and science professionals who want to improve their communication, students, and concerned citizens.

 Making Environmental Education Relevant to Culturally Diverse Audiences 

  • This is a 12-week online self-study course offered through University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point that you can begin at any time.
  • Learn the basic knowledge and skills you need to make environmental education relevant to culturally diverse audiences. Part of the course includes adapting a part of your program to make it relevant for a diverse audience of your choice.
  • The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service has limited pre-paid, non-credit spaces available only for U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service employees.

Urban Environmental Education

  • This is an online self-study course offered through NCTC that you can begin at any time.
  • The course is for formal and non-formal environmental educators currently working in an urban setting or interested in working with urban populations. It focuses on how to utilize natural areas in an urban setting, urban environmental issues, and techniques to engage urban populations.

Environmental Education Theory and Practice

  • This is a 12-week online self-study course that requures an average of 10-15 hours per week in order to pass.
  • The goal is to provide you with a foundational knowledge of EE and the skills to become a more effective educator. Course participants discuss the history, definition, and goals of environmental education; develop an understanding of the professional roles and instructional methods of environmental educators; and interact with other educators from across the country. 

 


Podcasts 

Commitment to Collaboration: Facilitating Working groups of Tribes and Government Agencies 

  • Released December 15, 2016
  • Duration 19:54
  • Listen to Richard Arnold and Jeremy Spoon discuss their work facilitating collaborations with tribes and federal land management agencies to conserve nature and culture -- two things we can never really separate. What makes these collaborations successful? This podcast is a follow-up to our last episode, Building Visitor Centers, Building Relationships, below.

Building Visitor Centers, Building Relationships  

  • Released July 28, 2016
  • Duration 19:54
  • Join Danielle Ross-Winslow as she interviews Angelina Yost about an inspiring story of collaboration between a Refuge and local tribes. In 2012, Desert National Wildlife Refuge Complex began designing and building visitor centers for Desert, Ash Meadows, and Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuges. Larger efforts were underway to restore relationships and build partnerships with the seven tribes of Nuwuvi, or Southern Paiutes. The planning and design of the visitor centers was in collaboration with Nuwuvi and the voice of Nuwuvi is woven throughout the exhibits.

Identifying and Engaging Stakeholders 

  • Released April 29, 2016
  • Duration 19:54
  • Who are stakeholders? Why do you need to know? In this podcast, Dr. Katie Steiger-Meister, Senior Public Affairs Specialist with the USFWS Midwest Office of External Affairs, talks about the importance of and tools for stakeholder identification and engagement. 

Persuasive Communication for Behavior Change 

  • Released March 9, 2016
  • Duration 12:25
  • Learn some tips for using persuasive communication to influence conservation behavior. In this podcast, we'll hear from Dr. Shawn Davis, professor of communication at Northern Michigan University and Ms. Lori Brown-Large of Action Research, marketing consultant and social scientist. 

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service HDgov Resource Portal Podcast 

  • Recorded September 22, 2015
  • Duration 5:58
  • The Human Dimensions Branch of the National Wildlife Refuge System is pleased to announce the launch of the Human Dimensions Resource Portal on HDgov. In this podcast the speakers, Danielle Ross-Winslow, Juliette Fernandez and Brad Milley will go over the various aspects of the site, their functionality, and who can benefit from them. 

Strategic Communication for Strategic Conservation 

  • Released November 11, 2014
  • Duration 17:37
  • If we want people to conserve fish, wildlife and habitats, we must better understand how to engage with our audiences and effectively communicate with them. In this podcast, Dr. Jessica Thompson, Northern Michigan State University professor, shares tips and best practices for understanding and communicating to make our messages stick.

Human-Wildlife Interactions: Coexisting with Key Deer 

  • Released June 5, 2015
  • Duration 19:23
  • Human-wildlife interactions can create obstacles for wildlife conservation efforts. In this podcast we'll hear from Nancy Finley, manager of the Florida Keys National Wildlife Refuge Complex, and Dave Case from D.J. Case & Associates, about the negative impacts of Key deer feeding and what's being done about it.

Understanding a Changing America: A Key to Successful Conservation 

  • Released November 14, 2013
  • Duration 17:28
  • Being relevant in our conservation work requires that we understand the demographic changes in the US. In this podcast, Dr. Steve Murdock, Rice University professor and former director of the U.S. Census Bureau, shares some key demographic and socioeconomic trends we are seeing in the US and why a fundamental understanding of these trends is an important part of ensuring successful conservation.

How to Know it When You See It: Human Dimensions of Natural Resource Management 

  • Recorded August 21, 2013
  • Duration 20:26
  • In this podcast, Aaron Mize, Deputy Refuge Manager at Bosque del Apache and Natalie Sexton Chief of the Human Dimensions Branch/NWRS, discuss the relevance of the human dimensions to refuges and their management. To help natural resource practitioner better identify and address the human dimensions, they describe the social science behind topics such as behavior change, strategic communications and stakeholder engagement and provide examples of applying these concept to natural resource management.

Beyond the Blue Goose Sign 

  • Recorded August 8, 2013
  • Duration 12:54
  • Natalie Sexton, Chief of Human Dimensions Branch/ NWRS, interviews Charlie Pelizza, Refuge Manager of Everglades Headwaters NWR and Conservation Area about the human dimensions of landscape conservation and planning. Charlie shares lessons learned through his experiences in leading the establishment of this refuge.

 


 

Recorded Broadcasts, Webinars, and Podcasts (by topic)

Human Dimensions Overview

Why does it Matter? Attitudes and Values Make a Difference for Conservation 

  • Recorded April 11, 2013
  • Duration 1:15:58
  • Part of the Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Conservation Broadcast Series
  • Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Conservation 2013 Broadcast Series. Presented by Jeremy T. Bruskotter, PhD, Ohio State University; Catherine E. Doyle-Capitman, Yale School; Michelle Potter and Natalie Sexton, USFWS. How people think and feel about conservation holds clues for what people do about conservation. In this broadcast we will explore the science behind understanding the attitudes and values of stakeholders and how to integrate this knowledge into conservation. We will more systematically define these social influences and share methods to effectively measure them for use in natural resource management decisions. The broadcast also includes an interactive round table discussion with the host and viewers asking the panel about their experience working with attitudes and values for conservation.

The Social Aspects of Natural Resource Conservation 

  • Recorded August 2012
  • Duration 1:10:24
  • Part of the Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Conservation Broadcast Series
  • Presented by Shawn J. Riley, Michigan State University, Associate Professor, Fisheries and Wildlife, Scientist, Partnership for Ecosystem Research and Management; Natalie Sexton, USFWS, Natural Resource Program Center, Chief, Branch of Human Dimensions; Aaron Mize, USFWS, Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, Acting Refuge Manager. Host: Mike Carlo, USFWS, National Wildlife Refuge System. Knowledge for effective conservation includes knowledge about organisms, knowledge about the environment and knowledge about humans. In this broadcast, we will more clearly define this human aspect, which includes the application of social psychology, economics, political science, communications and more. In part one of the session, the presenters will introduce the theory and practical application of this social aspect to our conservation work. We will also introduce you to the recently created Branch of Human Dimensions at the Natural Resource Program Center. Part two is an interactive round table discussion, with the host and viewers asking the panel specific questions about their experience linking the human dimension with conservation.

Relating Human Dimensions to Conservation – Why Does It Matter? 

  • Recorded May 2012
  • Duration 54:42
  • Part of the 2012 National FWS Communications & Outreach Workshop
  • The concepts of human dimensions in conservation date back to Aldo Leopold, one of the fathers of conservation and land ethic. More recently, though, there has been greater emphasis on integrating the human dimensions science into natural resources management. This integration includes the important work of communicating conservation science and activities. This session will provide an overview of human dimensions concepts (the toolbox) and the tools and methods that can be applied to natural resources communication and outreach. The session will also provide results from the recently completed national wildlife refuge visitor survey.

How to Know it When You See It: Human Dimensions of Natural Resource Management 

  • Recorded August 21, 2013
  • Duration 20:26
  • Part of the Human Dimensions of Conservation Podcast Series
  • In this podcast, Aaron Mize, Deputy Refuge Manager at Bosque del Apache and Natalie Sexton Chief of the Human Dimensions Branch/NWRS, discuss the relevance of the human dimensions to refuges and their management. To help natural resource practitioner better identify and address the human dimensions, they describe the social science behind topics such as behavior change, strategic communications and stakeholder engagement and provide examples of applying these concept to natural resource management.

Addressing the Human Dimensions of Conservation 

  • Recorded May 2014
  • Duration 57:10
  • Plains and Prairie Potholes LCC Technical Team Webinar
  • Natalie Sexton with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service discusses the role of human dimensions in natural resource conservation.

 

Landscape Conservation

Landscape Conservation Design: Conserving Sustainable Landscapes for Natural Resources and People 

  • Recorded February 12, 2014
  • Duration 1:12:19
  • Part of the Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Conservation Broadcast Series 
  • Hosted by Sarena Selbo, Chief, Branch of Conservation Planning and Design, USFWS, National Wildlife Refuge System. Presented by Rob Campellone, Landscape Conservation Design Policy Advisor, USFWS, National Wildlife Refuge System; Thomas Miewald, Landscape Ecologist, USFWS, North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative and the National Wildlife Refuge System; and Charlie Pelizza, Refuge Manager, USFWS, Pelican Island National Wildlife Refuge. Conserving sustainable landscapes in the 21st century is a significant challenge that requires a fundamental shift in thinking and action, addressing both social and ecological systems. "Landscape conservation design" involves intentional human changes to landscape patterns to sustainably provide ecosystem services that meet societal needs and respect societal values. This paradigm is innately interdisciplinary and partner-driven, involving diverse stakeholders, who plan, identify and implement strategies across the landscape to achieve diverse goals. In this broadcast, we will explore the "why," the "what" and the "how" of landscape conservation design, focusing on addressing both the ecological and human dimensions needed to achieve sustainable landscapes. The broadcast also includes an interactive round table discussion with the host and viewers asking the panel about their experiences with landscape conservation design and conserving sustainable landscapes.

Beyond the Blue Goose Sign 

  • Recorded August 8, 2013
  • Duration 12:54
  • Part of the Human Dimensions of Conservation Podcast Series
  • Natalie Sexton, Chief of Human Dimensions Branch/ NWRS, interviews Charlie Pelizza, Refuge Manager of Everglades Headwaters NWR and Conservation Area about the human dimensions of landscape conservation and planning. Charlie shares lessons learned through his experiences in leading the establishment of this refuge.

 Social Implications of Selecting Focal Species to Guide Conservation 

  • Recorded January 30, 2014
  • Requires WebEx Player
  • Part of the Interactions of Society and the Environment Seminar Series
  • Surrogate species approaches have been applied in various contexts in attempts to simplify or focus conservation efforts. Four different types of surrogate species have been identified: indicators, umbrellas, keystones, and flagships. This seminar will focus on flagship species, which are “popular, charismatic species that serve as symbols and rallying points to stimulate conservation awareness and action.” Flagship species are particularly valuable for their potential to impact conservation behaviors, including increasing support for fundraising. However, like with any surrogate species, there are multiple social implications of using flagship species to garner support for conservation. In this seminar, we first outline the different surrogate species approaches, describing the distinct objectives and social implications of each approach. We then explore the relationship between flagship species and social conflict, examining how we might preempt the potentially negative consequences of conflicts for both people and flagship species. Lastly, we present research of potential flagship species for a Tanzanian National Park as a case study and discuss the lessons learned.

 

Visitor Management

Visitor Use Management: Balancing Societal Benefits with Resource Protection and Conservation 

  • Recorded May 22, 2014
  • Duration 1:18:17
  • Part of the Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Conservation Broadcast Series
  • Host: Mike Carlo, USFWS, Nat'l Wildlife Refuge System Presenters Jeffrey Brooks, USFWS, Alaska Region; Jeffrey Marion, Natural Resource Recreation; and Bob Proudman, Appalachian Trail Conservancy. Providing and managing visitor experiences in our parks, refuges and other natural areas can be both a challenge and an opportunity, as we strive to enhance the public's connection with the outdoors and balance it with conservation. In this broadcast we will explore the science and issues of visitor use management and how to integrate this with resource management. The broadcast also includes an interactive round table discussion with the host and viewers asking the panel about their involvement with visitor use management.

 

Public Engagement

A Dose of the Outdoors: The Connection Between Nature and Human Health 

  • Recorded August 4, 2016
  • Duration 51:49
  • Part of the Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Conservation Broadcast Series
  • There are multiple studies that prove how nature positively affects human health and well-being. In this broadcast we'll hear about these studies. We'll also hear from USFWS practitioners who are working with health professionals and neighboring refuge communities on efforts to improve human health by connecting people with nature. Promoting links between nature and health could play a critical role in growing support for conservation and the protection of natural areas for our health and enjoyment. Presenters include Dr. Frances (Ming) Kuo, NRES, Associate Professor & Director, Landscape and Human Health Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Georgia Jeppesen, USFWS, Team Lead, Career Awareness Branch, Division of Education and Outreach, National Conservation Training Center; and Robin Will, USFWS, Supervisory Refuge Ranger, St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge.

Identifying and Engaging Stakeholders 

  • Recorded February, 2016
  • Duration 19:54
  • Part of the Human Dimensions of Conservation Podcast Series
  • Who are stakeholders? Why do you need to know? In this podcast, Dr. Katie Steiger-Meister, Senior Public Affairs Specialist with the USFWS Midwest Office of External Affairs, talks about the importance of and tools for stakeholder identification and engagement. 


Land Ethic Leaders: Aldo Leopold's Land Ethic For Today 

  • Recorded October 23, 2013
  • Duration 1:18
  • Part of the Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Conservation Broadcast Series
  • During this broadcast, you will be introduced to the Aldo Leopold's "land ethic", a moral responsibility of humans to the natural world. You'll learn about Leopold's ideas in greater depth and how environmental education containing observation, participation and reflection can lead to greater engagement in conservation, with the Aldo Leopold Foundation's Land Ethic Leaders program as an example.

Citizen Science: Engaging Public Participation in Environment Research to Meet Shared Conservation Goals 

  • Recorded April 11, 2013
  • Duration 50:15
  • Part of the Interactions of Society and the Environment Seminar Series
  • Presented by Carolyn Enquist, US-Nat'l Phenology Network and the Wildlife Society & Jana Newman and Janety Ady, USFWS.

Embracing the Cultural Diversity of our Visitors and Stakeholders 

  • Recorded December, 2012
  • Duration 01:13:31
  • Part of the Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Conservation Broadcast Series
  • Presented by Myron Floyd, PhD, North Carolina State University, Professor/Director of Graduate Programs, Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management.; Iantha Gantt-Wright, MSA Founder and President of The Kenian Group; Lamar Gore, USFWS, Northeast Regional Office, Chief, Diversity and Civil Rights. An effective conservation strategy includes engagement of people within diverse populations. To be relevant, we need to be innovative, resourceful and also respectful of what’s important to the people we are attempting to reach. Welcoming all groups and individuals, including those who traditionally may not be as directly connected. In this broadcast, we will more clearly define what we mean by diversity which encompasses culture, ethnicity, economics, age, gender, ability, and explore ways to foster inclusion for conservation. The broadcast also includes an interactive round table discussion with the host and viewers asking the panel about their experiences with embracing diversity for conservation.

Engaging with Urban Communities: Connecting People, Conservation & Public Land Agencies 

  • Recorded May 24, 2012
  • Duration 01:09:10
  • Part of the Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Conservation Broadcast Series
  • Presented by Flisa Stevenson, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Refuge Visitor Services; Gus Medina, Cornell University - Expanding Capacity in Environmental Education Project; Chantel Jimenez, San Diego NWR Complex. This broadcast will focus on "place-based" urban conservation connections: who are some target audiences, why the environment matters to them and how we can become more involved with urban communities. In part one of the session, our presenters will introduce you to urban communities and how we can connect with them. Part two is an interactive round table discussion, with the host and viewers asking the panel specific questions about linking public lands programs with conservation and urban communities.

Connecting to Our Changing Communities  Video temporarily unavailable

  • Recorded May, 2012
  • Duration 53:24
  • Part of the 2012 National FWS Communications & Outreach Workshop - Classroom presentation by Flo McAfee, President, Summerland Studio
  • Based on the 2010 Census, America's communities are changing colors and changing the role of women. The numbers reveal substantial increases in Latino and Asian populations and more people identifying as multiracial. Women now fill the majority of jobs in the country. Eighty-five percent of net population growth has been of people of color. Trends point toward continued growth in ethnic and recial diversity and continued change across the landscape throughout the 21st century. How does the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service connect with our changing communities and engage their thoughts about conservation and nature? This session will provide and overview of the changing demographics from majority minorities to modern families, explain how to connect to changing communities through multicultural media relations, and offer examples of media outlets specifically targeting diverse populations.

 

Tools for Understanding Audiences

Tools for Understanding Audiences 

  • Recorded January, 2014
  • Duration 46:46
  • From the Communicationa, Outreach, and Visitor Services (COVS) Webinar Series
  • Have the demographics in your area changed recently, thus, changing your target audiences? What are the ethnic and cultural backgrounds of your visitors? Who are the nontraditional or underserved audiences in communities near your refuge? What are the visitation trends to the refuge over the last 5 years? What recreation activities have the highest demand in the area, region, and state? In a changing America, the answers to these and more questions are important for planning our Visitor Services activities and to efforts like the Urban Wildlife Refuge Initiative. We’ll discuss the importance of understanding audiences and context at local, regional, and national levels for your refuge and provide information on tools and resources for you to begin to find the answers.
  • Upon completion of this webinar, you will be able to:
    • identify existing tools and data to better understand visitors, communities, and the socioeconomic landscape related to your refuge;
    • better understand experiences of visitors to refuges using ViSIT tool;
    • understand how to use tools to understand demographics and socioeconomic information about communities surrounding your refuge;
    • understand where to find information to better understanding the role refuges play in local economies; and
    • be able to apply the information to your unique refuge issues.

Understanding a Changing America: A Key to Successful Conservation 

  • Recorded September 23, 2013
  • Duration 17:28
  • Part of the Human Dimensions of Conservation Podcast Series
  • Being relevant in our conservation work requires that we understand the demographic changes in the US. In this podcast, Dr. Steve Murdock, Rice University professor and former director of the U.S. Census Bureau, shares some key demographic and socioeconomic trends we are seeing in the US and why a fundamental understanding of these trends is an important part of ensuring successful conservation.

 

Collaborative Conservation

Collaborative Conservation: Examples from the United States and Australia 

  • Recorded March 28, 2013
  • Duration 1:23:17
  • Part of the Interactions of Society and the Environment Seminar Series
  • Presented by Peter Williams, PhD, Collaborative Plannin and Multiparty Monitoring Specialist, USDA Forest Service.

  

Geospatial 

Integrating spatial data: Mapping social values in relation to energy and water resources in the western U.S

  • Recorded March 7, 2013
  • Duration 01:09:050
  • Part of the Interactions of Society and the Environment Seminar Series
  • Efforts to place human beliefs into geospatial representations of landscapes are increasingly being used to inform natural resource planning and management. In this seminar, we investigate ways in which mapping of social data can help to address issues stemming from people’s dependence on energy and water resources in the western U.S. First, we explore The Nature Conservancy’s work on mapping human preferences for energy development in Wyoming in relation to other values, participants' homes, and existing development. We then investigate the Colorado Water Institute’s mapping techniques for identifying locations where new initiatives for water use, sharing, and conservation may be implemented. Inherent to these two projects is a greater need for integration of social and biological data when addressing complex resource issues.

 

Communications

 Community-Based Social Marketing: Behavior Change Strategies that Work 

  • Recorded November 17, 2016
  • Duration 01:02:09
  • Part of the Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Conservation Broadcast Series
  • In this broadcast, we will explore the principles and strategies of community-based social marketing, an approach to behavior change based in behavioral psychology and general marketing principles. We’re not talking about Facebook, Twitter, or other social media marketing. We are talking about an approach that has been successfully applied across the U.S. and the globe, including nationwide efforts by USFWS and partners to eradicate invasive species.

Persuasive Communication for Behavior Change 

  • Recorded September 29, 2015
  • Duration 12:25
  • Part of the Human Dimensions of Conservation Podcast Series
  • Learn some tips for using persuasive communication to influence conservation behavior. In this podcast, we'll hear from Dr. Shawn Davis, professor of communication at Northern Michigan University and Ms. Lori Brown-Large of Action Research, marketing consultant and social scientist. 

Engaging Audiences  video temporarily unavailable

  • Recorded July 31, 2014
  • Duration 01:33:07
  • Part of the FWS Communications, Outreach, and Visitor Services Webinar Series
  • Two years ago, Flisa Stevenson and Chantel Jimenez shared their insights on engaging urban audiences during our Human Dimensions in Natural Resources Conservation Broadcast Series. Since that broadcast, the Urban Refuge Initiative Team has been at work, evolving into the Urban Refuge Program; funding has been identified to form urban refuge partnerships; and, standards have been developed to provide guidance on successfully reaching audiences who may not be connected with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and our mission. Join us as we look at where we are, two years later. Find out what’s working on the ground and how what we learn about connecting with urban audiences can benefit anyone working to reach an underserved audience - urban or rural.

Strategic Communication for Strategic Conservation 

  • Recorded May 28, 2014
  • Duration 17:37
  • Part of the Human Dimensions of Conservation Podcast Series
  • If we want people to conserve fish, wildlife and habitats, we must better understand how to engage with our audiences and effectively communicate with them. In this podcast, Dr. Jessica Thompson, Northern Michigan State University professor, shares tips and best practices for understanding and communicating to make our messages stick.

Randy Olson: Communicating a Message through Storytelling 

  • Recorded
  • Duration 01:07:36
  • Why is storytelling so important when communicating? Randy Olson will give you the plain truth behind what captures audiences and makes them remember. He is a scientist-turned-filmmaker, from academia to Hollywood, and the perfect person to ask how to communicate our science.

Communicating Science - We're All in this Together 

  •  Recorded May, 2012
  • Duration 57:08
  • From the 2012 National FWS Communications & Outreach Workshop - A classroom presentation by Dr. Gabriela Chavarria, Science Advisor to the Director for the USFWS
  • In the Fish and Wildlife Service, we are all communicators for conservation - in all our different jobs and from all Program Areas. Good overall science communication helps to connect with people, where they are - in their "backyards". Our audience is not always on the same page with technology, not all are scientists; we need to relate our critical messages with a relationship to people in their daily lives. This harks back to our mission--- for the continuing benefit of the American people. Dr. Chavarria will cover the essence of good science communications, from her experience as a leading expert in pollination biology, studying under the direction of Edward O. Wilson and as our Science Advisor.

 

Economics

Nature-Based Tourism and Economic Benefits 

  • Recorded February 2, 2012
  • Duration 01:25:18
  • Part of the Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Conservation Broadcast Series
  • This is the first program in the Human Dimensions of Natural Resource Conservation series. Presenters: Nancy Milar, Texas Convention & Visitors Bureau; Ted Eubanks, Fermata; Toni Westland, FWS. Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Conservation addresses the relationship of people to the land and wildlife. Through understanding matters such as human values, cultural ecology, sense of place and economics, we are better prepared to effectively manage and conserve our natural resources. The Fish and Wildlife Service mission speaks to this as we strive to protect and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people.                                                                                                                     

The Use of Economic Information in the USFWS: Resources, Rationale, and Applications  video temporarily unavailable

  • Recorded October 18, 2012
  •  Duration 01:00:43
  • Part of the Science Applications Web Conference Series

 

Climate Change

Climate Change: A Wicked Problem Wrapped in a Communicator’s Conundrum  video temporarily unavailable

  • Recorded June 5, 2013
  • Duration 55:29
  • Part of the FWS Communications, Outreach, and Visitor Services Webinar Series
  • Presented by Dr. Theresa Coble, Stephen F. Austin State University. Analysts suggest that a wicked problem is a “social mess” that is conflict-laden and resistant to resolution. Many place global climate change squarely in the wicked problem camp. For communicators, climate change is a wicked problem on multiple levels.

Communicating Climate Change: Perspectives from Working with Federal Agencies 

  • Recorded February 14, 2013
  • Duration 01:21:20
  • Part of the Interactions of Society and the Environment Seminar Series
  • The potential impacts of climate change are serious challenges to the management of public lands. The success of policy and action aimed at addressing these challenges is often linked to support of both internal (within agency) and external (public) audiences. During this seminar, we will discuss the efforts of the National Park Service's Climate Change Response Program to communicate climate change within the agency, and the Climate Change Education Partnership's work on implementing informal climate change education programming in National Parks and Wildlife Refuges. Finally, we will investigate ways to communicate about climate change with different audiences using message frames explored as part of a nationwide survey of visitors to the National Wildlife Refuge System.

Communicating Climate Change  video temporarily unavailable

  • Recorded October 19, 2011
  • Durations 01:21:33
  • Part of the Safeguarding Wildlife from Climate Change - NWF/NCTC Web Conference Series
  • Safeguarding Wildlife from Climate Change - NWF/NCTC Webinar Series. Presented by Connie Roser-Renouf, Center for Climate Change Communication, George Mason University. Connie Roser-Renouf will discuss audience segmentation research on Americans’ beliefs, attitudes and behaviors related to climate change. She will describe the relationship between parents’ and children’s attitudes toward climate change, and explore communication strategies for reaching six distinct audience groups, Global Warming’s Six Americas.

‘Sizzle’ A Unique Perspective on Global Warming  video temporarily unavailable

  • Recorded July 21, 2011
  • Duration 58:41
  • NCTC Historian, Dr. Mark Madison hosts an interview with Scientist, Author & Filmmaker Randy Olson who will discuss his new film 'Sizzle'. Olson's book "Don't Be Such a Scientist: Talking Substance in an Age of Style" is also discussed. NCTC Historian, Dr. Mark Madison hosts an interview with Scientist, Author & Filmmaker Randy Olson who will discuss his new film “Sizzle”. Olson was a professor of marine biology at the University of New Hampshire. Despite his Harvard Ph.D., four years of post-doctoral research in Australia and Florida, and years of diving around the world from the Great Barrier Reef to Antarctica, he tossed it all in, resigned from his tenured professorship and moved to Hollywood to explore film as a medium for communicating science. Today he is an independent filmmaker and author of the book Don’t Be Such a Scientist: Talking Substance in an Age of Style. Olson also travels around the country teaching scientists how to better communicate critical scientific ideas to the broader public.

 

Human-Wildlife Interactions

Human-Wildlife Interactions: Coexisting with Key Deer 

  • Recorded May 20, 2015
  • Duration 19:23
  • Part of the Human Dimensions of Conservation Podcast Series
  • Human-wildlife interactions can create obstacles for wildlife conservation efforts. In this podcast we'll hear from Nancy Finley, manager of the Florida Keys National Wildlife Refuge Complex, and Dave Case from D.J. Case & Associates, about the negative impacts of Key deer feeding and what's being done about it.

Humans, Wildlife, and Their Shared Health 

  • Recorded September 23, 2015
  • Duration 46:00
  • Part of the Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Conservation Broadcast Series
  • Human-wildlife interactions such as injuries and wildlife disease outbreaks can be economically, socially, medically, and environmentally costly. With the recognition that human, animal, and environmental health are interconnected, interdisciplinary fields and approaches like One Health have emerged to inform policy, expand scientific knowledge, and address sustainability challenges. In this broadcast, we will discuss some of the challenges for land management agencies to maintain wildlife health and manage human-wildlife interactions and the social considerations that impact this work. The broadcast is presented by Kirsten Leong, PhD, NPS, Human Dimensions Program Manager, and Samantha Gibbs, DVM PhD, USFWS, Wildlife Veterinarian.

 

 


 

Other Human Dimensions Resources

 

USFWS Resource Portal on HDgov

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service HDgov Resource Portal Podcast 

  • Recorded September 22, 2015
  • Duration 5:58
  • Part of the Human Dimensions of Conservation Podcast Series
  • The Human Dimensions Branch of the National Wildlife Refuge System is pleased to announce the launch of the Human Dimensions Resource Portal on HDgov. In this podcast the speakers, Danielle Ross-Winslow, Juliette Fernandez and Brad Milley will go over the various aspects of the site, their functionality, and who can benefit from them.

 

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service HDgov Resource Portal Tutorial Video 

    • Recorded October 27, 2015
    • Duration 4:15
    • This video provides a walk-through tutorial of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's (Service) Human Dimensions Resource portal on the interagency HDgov website. The Human Dimensions Portal was created for Service employees by the Human Dimensions Branch of the National Wildlife Refuge System. The portal provides convenient access to human dimensions tools and resources applicable to your conservation work. It also encourages a community of practice of conservation practitioners through a blog and conversation forum; upcoming events; news and announcements; and a directory of social science experts in the Service.

 

Conservation in HD Newsletter

Values, Beliefs, and Attitudes

  • Welcome to the third issue of Conservation in HD. In this first of a two-part series, we’ll take a look at how understanding values, beliefs, and attitudes can help practitioners better manage wildlife and their habitats by understanding behaviors of the public and key stakeholders.

Communicating Our Science

  • Whether you consider yourself a conservation practitioner, decision maker, or scientist, you know that communication is an important part of your work. The fish, wildlife, plants, and habitats we work to conserve depend on our ability to convey information internally, to partners, and to the public.

Stakeholder Engagement

  • This issue highlights stakeholder engagement - what it is, why it's important, and how to be successful. I hope you find it helpful. 

Influencing Conservation Behavior

  • This issue goes into factors that can influence behavior. Getting people to "think,"  "feel," or "do" is hard work and there's no silver bullet. Yet, people's actions are key to conservation success. As natural resource practitioners, it is in the best interest of the resource to understand human behavior and some techniques to influence it.

Announcing the launch of the FWS HD Resource Portal!

  • This issue announces the launch of the FWS HD Resource Portal, describes its features, and outline its usefulness to HD practitioners.

Engaging Culturally Diverse Audiences

  • As the United States population continues to diversify, it is evermore important for us to learn and use effective strategies to engage diverse audiences. In this issue, we give you an overview of the facts, strategies, and resources you need to do so.

Evaluating Social Ourcomes for Conservation

 

Publications

The State of Human Dimensions Capacity for Natural Resource Management: Needs, Knowledge, and Resources; Sexton et al.

  • The George Wright Forum, vol. 30, no 2, pp. 142-153, Dec 2013.
  • The social sciences have become increasingly important in understanding natural resource management contexts and audiences, and are essential in the design and delivery of effective and durable management strategies. Yet many agencies and organizations do not have the necessary resources and staff to effectively address the human dimensions (HD) of natural resource management. We draw on the textbook definition of HD: how and why people value natural resources, what benefits people seek and derive from those resources, and how people affect and are affected by those resources and their management (Decker, Brown, and Siemer 2001). Clearly articulating how HD information can be used and integrated into natural resource management planning and decision-making is an important challenge faced by the HD field. To address this challenge, we formed a collaborative team to explore the issue of HD capacity-building for natural resource organizations and to advance the HD field. We define HD capacity as activities, efforts, and resources that enhance the ability of HD researchers and practitioners and natural resource managers and decision-makers to understand and address the social aspects of conservation.

 

Credit: Brienne Magee (Wikimedia Commons)

Photo Credit: Brienne Magee (Wikimedia Commons)