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Unglulates (hoofed mammals) and vehicle collisions are serious challenges for conservation management of various large species throughout the world. This report explores how sensitive statistical database are to how frequently or consistently these collisions are reported.
Human-wildlife interactions such as injuries and wildlife disease outbreaks can be economically, socially, medically, and environmentally costly.
Human-wildlife interactions can create obstacles for wildlife conservation efforts.
There are multiple studies that prove how nature positively affects human health and well-being. In this broadcast we'll hear about these studies.
Susan Burks, from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, joins us to discuss her work to prevent the spread of invasive species through a program called PlayCleanGo: Stop Invasive Species in Your Tracks.
Where high-traffic roads are situated near wildlife habit, there are significant safety and conservation concerns. Improvements to these areas depend on the quality of Wildlife-vehicle collision data collection.
This case study takes a closer look at Moose-vehicle collisions in the state of Vermont, where one third of all reported moose-vehicle collisions result in motorist injury or fatality.
Roads have direct and indirect ecological impacts on wildlife, and vehicle collisions are one of the top impacts with regard to birds. Current available mortality estimates for birds are derived from one study, which prompted a literature review of 20 mortality rates extracted from 13 studies, which generated 4 separate estimates along with uncertainty from the different datasets.
Wildlife-vehicle collisions seem to be increasing over the last few decades in both the United States and Canada. This publication calculates the overall cost of the average collision, and reviewed the cost of collision mitigation measures to calculate the overall cost-benefit and where the break-even point is to start gaining benefits.