HD Search Tool

human-wildlife conflict x

Results

This study finds 58% fewer wildlife mortalities from wildlife-vehicle collisions where underpasses and fencing are along highways, and provides additional insight for continuous fencing along highways.
Human–wildlife conflicts like wildlife–vehicle collisions pose major challenges for the management and conservation of mobile wildlife in human-dominated landscapes, particularly when large species are involved.
Unglulates (hoofed mammals) and vehicle collisions are serious challenges for conservation management of various large species throughout the world. This report explores how sensitive statistical database are to how frequently or consistently these collisions are reported.
Human-wildlife interactions such as injuries and wildlife disease outbreaks can be economically, socially, medically, and environmentally costly.
Human-wildlife interactions can create obstacles for wildlife conservation efforts.
There are multiple studies that prove how nature positively affects human health and well-being. In this broadcast we'll hear about these studies.
Susan Burks, from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, joins us to discuss her work to prevent the spread of invasive species through a program called PlayCleanGo: Stop Invasive Species in Your Tracks.
Where high-traffic roads are situated near wildlife habit, there are significant safety and conservation concerns. Improvements to these areas depend on the quality of Wildlife-vehicle collision data collection.
This case study takes a closer look at Moose-vehicle collisions in the state of Vermont, where one third of all reported moose-vehicle collisions result in motorist injury or fatality.