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human-wildlife conflict x public safety x

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This study finds 58% fewer wildlife mortalities from wildlife-vehicle collisions where underpasses and fencing are along highways, and provides additional insight for continuous fencing along highways.
Where high-traffic roads are situated near wildlife habit, there are significant safety and conservation concerns. Improvements to these areas depend on the quality of Wildlife-vehicle collision data collection.
This case study takes a closer look at Moose-vehicle collisions in the state of Vermont, where one third of all reported moose-vehicle collisions result in motorist injury or fatality.
Consequences for relocating specific reptiles and amphibians can vary significantly between successfully saving an endangered species and unsuccessful mitigation of human conflict associated with a particular creature. This article examines the management practices for relocating individual creatures causing human-wildlife conflict.
A collection of publications examining key human wildlife conflicts and how public land managers are sustaining the safety and future for both humans and wildlife.