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International Environmental Communication Association (IECA) will again be offering our online course Environmental Communication: Research Into Practice.
The course goal is to help participants learn to communicate more effectively about science with people outside their field, including the general public, policy makers, the media, or funders and prospective collaborators in other disciplines.
The potential impacts of climate change are serious challenges to the management of public lands.
The editors of A Thinking Person's Guide to America's National Parks have created a complete set of free teaching materials for a course titled "Introduction to America's National Park System: Managing the Natural and Cultural Heritage of a Changing Nation." This 24-lesson course uses the book as the core text, and each lesson includes research questions that students explore via the National Park Service's website. The course covers the full variety of resources in America's national parks—and the challenges of managing them.
Together, NCCWSC and the CSCs provide resource managers and other stakeholders with information and decision-making tools to respond to the effects of climate change on fish, wildlife, ecosystems, and the communities they support. Through close collaboration with managers and scientists inside and outside of government, NCCWSC and the CSCs deliver science to address stakeholder-defined priority climate needs. Learn more about our science approach or read snapshots of our work.
Communication via storytelling, according to Randy Olson, is essential to communicate science and grab the public's attention.
This article explores the relationship between the scientific information and users of scientific information, including what sources are trusted and used most.
In identifying how environmental issues can be improved with an understanding of the human dimensions, this article reviews 18 fields and identifies 10 distinct contributions that social sciences can make to conservation. It also provides reference for those wishing to engage with the conservation social sciences.
Confusion about the link between human-induced climate change and extreme weather events is fairly common. There is a communication problem that has resulted in this confusion through erroneous messages or unclear linkages between humans and extremem weather events, and a need for more effective communication of what current scientific findings indicate for specific weather events.
This seminar series provides a forum balanced between students and professionals to discuss societal involvement in natural resource policy and decisions. Presentations focus on theory and methodology, research findings, and management implications. ISESS is a catalyst for building stronger connections among natural resource professionals and students along Colorado's Front Range and beyond.